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    Home > Active Ingredient News > Immunology News > A&R: Association between gut microbiota and elevated serum uric acid in two independent cohorts

    A&R: Association between gut microbiota and elevated serum uric acid in two independent cohorts

    • Last Update: 2022-05-13
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    Purpose: Hyperuricemia is a precursor to gout and is often present in other metabolic diseases promoted by dysbiosis of the microbiota

    .
    This study explored the relationship of gut microbiota to human hyperuricemia and serum urate levels
    .


    Purpose: Hyperuricemia is a precursor to gout and is often present in other metabolic diseases promoted by dysbiosis of the microbiota

    .
    This study explored the relationship of gut microbiota to human hyperuricemia and serum urate levels
    .


    Methods:
    Study participants were drawn from a community-based observational study, the Xiangya Osteoarthritis Study (Discovery Cohort)
    .
    Hyperuricemia was defined as serum uric acid levels >357 μM /L in women and >416 μM / L in men
    .
    Analysis of gut microbiota using 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing of stool samples .
    This study examines the relationship between dysbiosis (i.
    e.
    , the richness, diversity, composition, and relative abundance of microbial communities)
    and predicts functional pathways leading to hyperuricemia and serum urate levels .
    The investigators tested these associations in an independent observational study, the Step Study (validation cohort) .



    Study participants were drawn from a community-based observational study, the Xiangya Osteoarthritis Study (Discovery Cohort)
    .
    Hyperuricemia was defined as serum uric acid levels >357 μM /L in women and >416 μM / L in men
    .
    Analysis of gut microbiota using 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing of stool samples .
    This study examines the relationship between dysbiosis (i.
    e.
    , the richness, diversity, composition, and relative abundance of microbial communities)
    and predicts functional pathways leading to hyperuricemia and serum urate levels .
    The investigators tested these associations in an independent observational study, the Step Study (validation cohort) .




    RESULTS: The discovery cohort consisted of
    1392 subjects
    from rural areas (mean age 61.
    3
    years, 57.
    4%
    female, 17.
    2%
    with hyperuricemia) .
    Participants with hyperuricemia had reduced richness and diversity, altered microbiota composition, and lower relative abundance of Faecalis spp .
    Predicted KEGG metabolic pathways, including amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, were significantly altered in hyperuricemic subjects compared with normouric acid subjects .
    The richness, diversity and low relative abundance of Faecalicoccus in the gut microbiota were also associated with high levels of serum urate .
    These findings were validated in a validation cohort of 480 participants .





    The discovery cohort consisted of 1392 subjects from rural areas (mean age 61.
    3
    years, 57.
    4%
    female, 17.
    2%
    with hyperuricemia)
    .
    Participants with hyperuricemia had reduced richness and diversity, altered microbiota composition, and lower relative abundance of Faecalis spp
    .
    Predicted KEGG metabolic pathways, including amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, were significantly altered in hyperuricemic subjects compared with normouric acid subjects .
    The richness, diversity and low relative abundance of Faecalicoccus in the gut microbiota were also associated with high levels of serum urate .
    These findings were validated in a validation cohort of 480 participants .




    Conclusions:
    Intestinal dysbiosis is associated with elevated serum urate levels
    .
    This study examined the possibility that a dysbiosis of the microbiota may modulate serum urate levels

    .

    Intestinal dysbiosis is associated with elevated serum urate levels
    .
    This study examined the possibility that a dysbiosis of the microbiota may modulate serum urate levels

    .

     

    Source: Wei, J.
    , Zhang, Y.
    , Dalbeth, N.
    , Terkeltaub, R.
    , Yang, T.
    , Wang, Y.
    , Yang, Z.
    , Li, J.
    , Wu, Z.
    , Zeng, C .
    and Lei, G.
    (2022), Association Between Gut Microbiota and Elevated Serum Urate in Two Independent Cohorts.
    Arthritis Rheumatol, 74: 682-691.
     
    https://doi.
    org/10.
    1002/art.
    42009

    Wei, J.
    , Zhang, Y.
    , Dalbeth, N.
    , Terkeltaub, R.
    , Yang, T.
    , Wang, Y.
    , Yang, Z.
    , Li, J.
    , Wu, Z.
    , Zeng, C.
    and Lei, G.
    (2022), Association Between Gut Microbiota and Elevated Serum Urate in Two Independent Cohorts.
    Arthritis Rheumatol, 74: 682-691.
     
    https://doi.
    org/10.
    1002/art.
    42009


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