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    Home > Biochemistry News > Biotechnology News > Aging Cell: Scientists Reveal Perredoxin 3 Can Clear Mitochondrial Hydrogen Peroxide To Treat Muscle Atrophy

    Aging Cell: Scientists Reveal Perredoxin 3 Can Clear Mitochondrial Hydrogen Peroxide To Treat Muscle Atrophy

    • Last Update: 2022-05-23
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    The progressive loss of muscle mass and strength with age, known as sarcopenia, results in limited ability to perform daily activities in older adults, affecting quality of life and healthy longevity
    .
    Although the mechanisms leading to this pathology are not fully understood, reactive oxygen species, neuromuscular junction (NMJ) disruption, and nerve loss are important risk factors

    .

    Image credit: https://doi.
    org/10.
    1111/acel.
    13569

    Recently, researchers from the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation published a paper entitled "Scavenging mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide by peroxiredoxin 3 overexpression attenuates contractile dysfunction and muscle atrophy in a murine model of accelerated sarcopenia" in the journal "Aging Cell".
    Expression of peroxiredoxin 3 to scavenge mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide attenuates contractile dysfunction and muscle atrophy in mice with accelerated myasthenia

    .
    Our findings demonstrate that muscle-specific perredoxin 3 (PRDX3) overexpression reduces mitochondrial H2O2 production, improves mitochondrial function, and reduces muscle mass and muscle mass despite persistent NMJ damage in a mouse model of redox-dependent sarcopenia.
    loss of quality

    .

    First, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide on neurogenic atrophy and contractile dysfunction
    .
    The researchers first crossed mice overexpressing the mitochondrial H2O2 scavenger peroxidase 3 (mPRDX3) with superoxide dismutase (Sod1) knockout mice, an established mouse model of sarcopenia, to determine whether reducing myocardial H2O2 It can prevent or delay the occurrence of redox-dependent sarcopenia

    .

    The researchers found that the basal production rate of H2O2 was increased in muscle mitochondria isolated from Sod1-knockout mice, which was normalized by mPRDX3 overexpression
    .
    Overexpression of mPRDX3 prevented the reduction of mitochondrial maximum oxygen consumption rate and calcium retention in Sod1 knockout

    .
    Muscle atrophy in Sod1 knockout was attenuated by mPRDX3 overexpression by 20%, which was associated with increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area

    .

    Peroxiredoxin 3 Human Transgene Construction Map (PRDX3)

    Image credit: https://doi.
    org/10.
    1111/acel.
    13569

    Taken together, our data suggest that increased PRDX3 expression in skeletal muscle normalizes excess mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production in redox-dependent sarcopenia
    .
    This was associated with attenuated atrophy and recovery from contractile dysfunction, suggesting that mitochondrial-derived hydrogen peroxide plays a partial role in muscle atrophy, but a larger role in impaired contractile function

    .

    The present study also reports the novel finding that mPRDX3 overexpression improves muscle quantity and quality, although in redox-dependent sarcopenia, the effect of mPRDX3 on NMJ injury is insufficient
    .
    Therefore, it is important to determine whether PRDX3 overexpression in muscle and neurons further protects muscle from age-related skeletal muscle atrophy and NMJ injury

    .
    Overall, the findings suggest the significance of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide and PRDX3 in osteoporosis, which could help narrow our targets for drug development in osteoporosis

    .
    (Bioon.
    com)

    references

    Bumsoo Ahn et al.
    Scavenging mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide by peroxiredoxin 3 overexpression attenuates contractile dysfunction and muscle atrophy in a murine model of accelerated sarcopenia.
    Aging Cell.
    2022 Feb 24;e13569.
    doi: 10.
    1111/acel.
    13569.

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