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    Home > Active Ingredient News > Endocrine System > ATVB: Changes in body mass index during adolescence are associated with coronary atherosclerosis and acute coronary events in adult men

    ATVB: Changes in body mass index during adolescence are associated with coronary atherosclerosis and acute coronary events in adult men

    • Last Update: 2021-06-28
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    Recently, the heart blood vessels published a research article in the authoritative magazine on the field of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, the study was designed to assess adolescent body mass index (BMI) change in adulthood coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and the risk of acute coronary events The relationship between
    .

    Heart blood vessels

    The researchers included 37672 men from the BMI epidemiological study and calculated their adolescent BMI changes (20-year-old BMI-8-year-old BMI)
    .
    The first acute coronary event information obtained by the researchers came from the Swedish National Registry (n=37672, n=1873)

    .

    The change of BMI in adolescence (the odds ratio for each increase in SD is 1.
    32 [1.
    14-1.
    52]) is related to middle-aged CAC score ≥ 1, but
    has nothing to do with
    childhood BMI
    .
    After adjusting for middle-aged BMI in CAC analysis and models that include major cardiovascular risk factors, the association between changes in adolescent BMI and CAC still exists

    .

    child

    Survival curve

    Compared with men who have never been overweight, individuals who are overweight during adolescence (hazard ratio of 2.
    11 [1.
    79-2.
    49]), but those who are overweight at the age of 8 who have a normal weight during adolescence are not, and the risk of acute coronary events is significantly increased

    .
    Among patients with acute coronary artery disease, individuals who are overweight during adolescence are at increased risk of dying from this event

    .

    It can be seen that changes in BMI during adolescence are independent predictors of adult male CAC scores and the risk of acute coronary events
    .
    Excessive increase in BMI in adolescence may lead to coronary atherosclerosis, thereby increasing the risk and severity of adult acute coronary events

    .

    Changes in BMI during adolescence are independent predictors of adult male CAC scores and the risk of acute coronary events
    .
    Excessive increase in BMI in adolescence may cause coronary atherosclerosis, thereby increasing the risk and severity of acute coronary events in adults

    Original source:

    Original source:

    Jenny M.
    Kindblom.
    et al.
    Pubertal Body Mass Index Change Is Associated With Adult Coronary Atherosclerosis and Acute Coronary Events in Men .
    ATVB.
    2021.
    https:// href="https://" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Pubertal Body Mass Index Change Is Associated With Adult Coronary Atherosclerosis and Acute Coronary Events in Men

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