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    Home > Active Ingredient News > Study of Nervous System > Commun Bio: Deep brain stimulation helps treat diseases

    Commun Bio: Deep brain stimulation helps treat diseases

    • Last Update: 2021-04-20
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    March 26, 2021 //---Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has significant utility in the treatment of movement disorders (such as Parkinson’s disease), researchers still do not know why the brain only responds to specific frequencies Respond to stimuli.
    In a recent study, researchers at the University of Houston are publishing an article in the journal Communications Biology, demonstrating that electrical stimulation of the brain at a higher frequency (> 100Hz) produces resonance waves, which can successfully recalibrate abnormalities.
    Circuit, thereby improving motor symptoms.

    "We studied the modulation of the local field potential caused by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamic subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's who underwent DBS surgery.
    We found that therapeutic high-frequency stimulation (130-180 Hz) can induce high Frequency oscillation (approximately 300 Hz, HFO) is similar to that observed in pharmacological treatment.
    " said Nuri Ince, associate professor of biomedical engineering.


    (Image source: www.
    pixabay.
    com)

    In the past few decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been one of the most important methods of Parkinson's treatment.
    In DBS, electrodes are surgically implanted into the deep brain, and electrical pulses are delivered at a certain rate to control tremor and other disabling movement signs related to the disease.


    So far, the process of finding the correct frequency is very time-consuming, sometimes taking months to implant the device and test its ability in the patient to a large extent during the back and forth process.
    Ince's method may speed up time, allowing the device to be programmed at the correct frequency almost immediately.


    "This is the first time we have recorded the response of brain waves while stimulating the brain.
    When we stimulate with electrical impulses, they will produce large-scale artifacts that mask the neural response.
    Through our signal processing methods, we can The effect of eliminating noise," Ince said.
    "If you know why certain frequencies are effective, then you can adjust the stimulation frequency according to the subject's specific conditions to make the treatment more personalized.
    " (Bioon.
    com)

    Information source: com/news/2021-03-discoveries-deep-brain-simulation-par.
    html">New discoveries of deep brain simulation put it on par with therapeutics

    Original source: Musa Ozturk, Ashwin Viswanathan, Sameer A.
    Sheth et al.
    Electroceutically induced subthalamic high-frequency oscillations and evoked compound activity may explain the mechanism of therapeutic stimulation in Parkinson's disease , Communications Biology (2021).
    DOI: 10.
    1038/s42003- 021-01915-7



    (Image source: www.
    pixabay.
    com)

    In the past few decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been one of the most important methods of Parkinson's treatment.
    In DBS, electrodes are surgically implanted into the deep brain, and electrical pulses are delivered at a certain rate to control tremor and other disabling movement signs related to the disease.


    So far, the process of finding the correct frequency is very time-consuming, sometimes taking months to implant the device and test its ability in the patient to a large extent during the back and forth process.
    Ince's method may speed up time, allowing the device to be programmed at the correct frequency almost immediately.


    "This is the first time we have recorded the response of brain waves while stimulating the brain.
    When we stimulate with electrical impulses, they will produce large-scale artifacts that mask the neural response.
    Through our signal processing methods, we can The effect of eliminating noise," Ince said.
    "If you know why certain frequencies are effective, then you can adjust the stimulation frequency according to the subject's specific conditions to make the treatment more personalized.
    " (Bioon.
    com)

    Information source: com/news/2021-03-discoveries-deep-brain-simulation-par.
    html">New discoveries of deep brain simulation put it on par with therapeutics

    Original source: Musa Ozturk, Ashwin Viswanathan, Sameer A.
    Sheth et al.
    Electroceutically induced subthalamic high-frequency oscillations and evoked compound activity may explain the mechanism of therapeutic stimulation in Parkinson's disease , Communications Biology (2021).
    DOI: 10.
    1038/s42003- 021-01915-7



    So far, the process of finding the correct frequency is very time-consuming, sometimes taking months to implant the device and test its ability in the patient to a large extent during the back and forth process.
    Ince's method may speed up time, allowing the device to be programmed at the correct frequency almost immediately.


    "This is the first time we have recorded the response of brain waves while stimulating the brain.
    When we stimulate with electrical impulses, they will produce large-scale artifacts that mask the neural response.
    Through our signal processing methods, we can The effect of eliminating noise," Ince said.
    "If you know why certain frequencies are effective, then you can adjust the stimulation frequency according to the subject's specific conditions to make the treatment more personalized.
    " (Bioon.
    com)

    Information source: com/news/2021-03-discoveries-deep-brain-simulation-par.
    html">New discoveries of deep brain simulation put it on par with therapeutics

    Original source: Musa Ozturk, Ashwin Viswanathan, Sameer A.
    Sheth et al.
    Electroceutically induced subthalamic high-frequency oscillations and evoked compound activity may explain the mechanism of therapeutic stimulation in Parkinson's disease , Communications Biology (2021).
    DOI: 10.
    1038/s42003- 021-01915-7



    "This is the first time we have recorded the response of brain waves while stimulating the brain.
    When we stimulate with electrical impulses, they will produce large-scale artifacts that mask the neural response.
    Through our signal processing methods, we can The effect of eliminating noise," Ince said.
    "If you know why certain frequencies are effective, then you can adjust the stimulation frequency according to the subject's specific conditions to make the treatment more personalized.
    " (Bioon.
    com)

    Information source: com/news/2021-03-discoveries-deep-brain-simulation-par.
    html">New discoveries of deep brain simulation put it on par with therapeutics

    Original source: Musa Ozturk, Ashwin Viswanathan, Sameer A.
    Sheth et al.
    Electroceutically induced subthalamic high-frequency oscillations and evoked compound activity may explain the mechanism of therapeutic stimulation in Parkinson's disease , Communications Biology (2021).
    DOI: 10.
    1038/s42003- 021-01915-7


    Information source: com/news/2021-03-discoveries-deep-brain-simulation-par.
    html">New discoveries of deep brain simulation put it on par with therapeutics

    Original source: Musa Ozturk, Ashwin Viswanathan, Sameer A.
    Sheth et al.
    Electroceutically induced subthalamic high-frequency oscillations and evoked compound activity may explain the mechanism of therapeutic stimulation in Parkinson's disease , Communications Biology (2021).
    DOI: 10.
    1038/s42003- 021-01915-7


    Information source: com/news/2021-03-discoveries-deep-brain-simulation-par.
    html">New discoveries of deep brain simulation put it on par with therapeutics
    Information source: com/news/2021-03-discoveries-deep-brain-simulation-par.
    html">New discoveries of deep brain simulation put it on par with therapeutics

    Original source: Musa Ozturk, Ashwin Viswanathan, Sameer A.
    Sheth et al.
    Electroceutically induced subthalamic high-frequency oscillations and evoked compound activity may explain the mechanism of therapeutic stimulation in Parkinson's disease , Communications Biology (2021).
    DOI: 10.
    1038/s42003- 021-01915-7


    Original source: Musa Ozturk, Ashwin Viswanathan, Sameer A.
    Sheth et al.
    Electroceutically induced subthalamic high-frequency oscillations and evoked compound activity may explain the mechanism of therapeutic stimulation in Parkinson's disease , Communications Biology (2021).
    DOI: 10.
    1038/s42003- 021-01915-7

    Original source: Electroceutically induced subthalamic high-frequency oscillations and evoked compound activity may explain the mechanism of therapeutic stimulation in Parkinson's disease
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