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    Home > Biochemistry News > Biotechnology News > Demystifying the taste molecular basis of Pieris rapae perceiving myrosin in cabbage

    Demystifying the taste molecular basis of Pieris rapae perceiving myrosin in cabbage

    • Last Update: 2021-07-30
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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      The large number and complex structure of secondary substances in plants constitute the unique taste of each plant
    .
    Most of these secondary substances have a defensive effect on herbivorous insects and hinder their feeding

    .
    However, some insects are not only unaffected by it, but instead use them as a marker stimulus to identify the host plant

    .
    This is the case with a variety of monophagous insects that feed on cruciferous plants

    .

      Pieris rapae ( Pieris rapae ) is a worldwide important agricultural pest.
    It is addicted to cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, rape, cabbage, and radish, which are eaten by the common people

    .
    The main reason is that the cabbage butterfly is addicted to glucosinolates, a type of secondary substance unique to these plants

    .
    Such substances can stimulate the mouthparts of the larvae of Pieris rapae and the special taste-sensing cells on the tarsus of the adult to produce nerve discharge, which stimulates the feeding of the larva and the laying of eggs by the adult

    .
    The gustatory receptor (Gr) expressed in these taste-sensing cells plays a key role in the specific recognition of different types of glucosinolates

    .
    Scientists have done a lot of work to unravel the mystery of cabbage butterfly’s taste addiction to glucosinolates, but the understanding of the taste receptors that sense glucosinolates has been blank

    .

      On July 15, 2021, Wang Chenzhu’s team from the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences published a research paper titled "Identification of a gustatory receptor tuned to sinigrin in the cabbage butterfly Pieris rapae " in PLoS Genetics , revealing for the first time that Pieris rapae feels a kind of The important glucosinolate-the taste receptor of sinigrin
    .

      The team used techniques and methods such as behavior, electrophysiology, cell biology, molecular biology, and omics to study the taste perception mechanism of Pieris rapae's addiction to glucosinolates from the behavioral, cellular, and molecular levels
    .
    They found that the five representative glucosinolates in cabbage can significantly stimulate the larvae of Pieris rapae to eat

    .
    On the mouthparts of the larvae of Pieris rapae and the tarsus of the adult forefoot, two types of taste organs were identified.
    One type is sensitive to all 5 glucosinolates tested, and the other type is only sensitive to one or two glucosinolates.

    .
    It is inferred that the taste-sensing cells for glucosinolates in Pieris rapae can be divided into broad-spectrum and narrow-spectrum

    .

      So, how do the receptors expressed on these taste-receiving cells tune the different types of glucosinolates? They then used transcriptome sequencing and fluorescence quantitative PCR to screen two highly expressed bitter taste receptor genes, PrapGr28 and PrapGr15 , from the taste organs of female adults of Pieris rapae, and speculated that they might be involved in the perception of glucosinolates
    .
    Further through Xenopus oocytes and double-electrode voltage clamp experiments, it was found that only the oocytes expressing the bitter taste receptor gene
    PrapGr28 were sensitive to myrosin stimulation
    .
    In order to verify this result, they also heterologously expressed the receptor gene in the sugar receptor Gr5a taste-sensing cells of the Drosophila L-type sensilla, and successfully endowed the Drosophila L-type sensilla with myrosin.
    Sensitivity

    .
    Finally, a method using RNA interference they reduce the cabbage butterfly
    PrapGr28 expression found before tarsus foot adult taste sensor response to electrophysiological stimulation sinigrin decreased, PrapGr28 bitter receptor is confirmed Pieris tuning taste sinigrin Receptor
    .

      Postdoctoral researcher Yang Jun from the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences is the first author of the paper, researcher Wang Chenzhu is the corresponding author, Guo Hao, Jiang Nanji, Tang Rui, Li Guocheng, Huang Lingqiao, and Professor Joop JA van Loon from Wageningen University Participate in the research of the subject
    .
    The achievement of this achievement has benefited from the combination of traditional electrophysiological techniques with modern omics and molecular biology methods, and provides strong evidence for the theory of co-evolution of insects and plants

    .
    This research was funded by the Pilot Special Cultivation Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China

    .

      At the same time, PLoS Genetics published a forward-looking review of the research by Professors Noah K.
    Whiteman and Julianne N.
    Peláez of the University of California, Berkeley, and believed that the research was in the field of neurobehavioral and sensory ecology of herbivorous insects.
    The important progress made is a solid step towards fully revealing the taste molecular basis of the addiction of glucosinolates by cruciferous insects and the secret of the complex taste system of herbivorous insects

    .

      Link to the paper: https://doi.
    org/10.
    1371/journal.
    pgen.
    1009527
    ; Link to the review article: https://journals.
    plos.
    org/plosgenetics/article?id=10.
    1371/journal.
    pgen.
    1009616

    Figure 1 The taste perception mechanism of the adult and larvae of Pieris rapae recognizing glucosinolate, the secondary substance of the host plant
    .
    Picture quoted from Whiteman and Peláez (2021)

    .

    Figure 2 Identification of taste receptors of Pieris rapae that sense myrosin
    .

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