echemi logo
Product
  • Product
  • Supplier
  • Inquiry
    Home > Active Ingredient News > Digestive System Information > Dig Liver Dis: Serum bile acid and glycol deoxycholic acid levels in patients with cystic fibrosis can be used as biomarkers of liver disease

    Dig Liver Dis: Serum bile acid and glycol deoxycholic acid levels in patients with cystic fibrosis can be used as biomarkers of liver disease

    • Last Update: 2022-01-07
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
    Search more information of high quality chemicals, good prices and reliable suppliers, visit www.echemi.com

    It is well known that in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), mutations in the transmembrane conductance regulator of CFTR (CFtr) can significantly reduce the flow of chloride ions in the cells
    .
    However, the viscous liquid will hinder the glands and their excretion, and may be invaded by pathogenic microorganisms

    .
    Therefore, CF patients usually experience symptoms including repeated respiratory infections and pancreatic insufficiency
    .
    The key functions of the liver include the synthesis and secretion of bile acids, and their conversion depends on the normal concentration of transcription factors

    .
    The liver synthesizes primary bile acids, mainly bile acids and ursodeoxy bile acids

    .
    The gastrointestinal bacteria (Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus) decompose and decarboxylate primary acids to form secondary and tertiary acids

    .
    Unfortunately, these natural metabolic pathways are disturbed in CF patients

    .
    Due to blockage of the bile ducts, excessive acid concentration can cause cytotoxicity to liver cells

    .
    In CF patients, due to high bile viscosity, a large amount of bile acids accumulate in the liver

    .
    Bile acids accumulate in liver cells, and once they exceed their capacity, bile acids are released into the blood

    .
    As the concentration of bile salts in the small intestine decreases, the emulsification effect becomes poor, which limits the bioavailability of fat-soluble nutrients

    .
    Therefore, cystic fibrosis (CF) and CF-related liver diseases can lead to disorders of bile acid metabolism

    .
    For this reason, this study aims to determine the serum bile acid concentration in CF and determine their usefulness in the evaluation of liver disease

    .

    It is well known that in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), mutations in the transmembrane conductance regulator of CFTR (CFtr) can significantly reduce the flow of chloride ions in the cells
    .
    However, the viscous liquid will hinder the glands and their excretion, and may be invaded by pathogenic microorganisms

    .
    Infect

     

    A total of 75 CF patients were included in this study: 25 were diagnosed with liver cirrhosis (11 women, 14 men, aged 9 to 33 years), and 25 had other non-cirrhotic liver diseases (12 women, 13 men) , 16 to 44 years old) and 25 without liver disease (12 females, 13 males, 17 to 36 years old)
    .
    The control group consisted of 25 healthy subjects (HS; 12 women, 13 men, aged 18 to 27 years)

    .
    In addition, the researchers also evaluated the individual CF characteristics of the patients, including the serum activity levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGTP)

    .
    Finally, the researchers measured primary, secondary, and bound bile acid levels for all subjects, and performed correlation analysis

    .

     

    The results of the study showed that, except for Glycyrrhiza deoxycholic acid (GDCA), bile acid levels in CF patients were higher than those in healthy controls
    .
    However, in all CF patients, there was no difference in bile acid concentration in patients with liver cirrhosis or other liver-affected patients

    .
    Serum GDCA and deoxycholic acid (DCA) can distinguish CF patients from patients with non-cirrhotic liver disease (GDCA-AUC: 0.
    924, 95% CI 0.
    822–1.
    000, p<0.
    001; DCA-AUC: 0.
    867, 95% CI: 0.
    731–1.
    000, p<0.
    001)

    .
    Principal component analysis showed that CF liver disease is related to GDCA, GGTP activity, severe genotype and pancreatic insufficiency

    .

     

    This study confirms that the specific bile acid profile in CF patients can be used to identify liver diseases
    .
    Among them, GDCA can distinguish patients with non-cirrhotic liver involvement from patients with undetected liver disease

    .
    Therefore, GDCA can be validated as a biomarker for the progression of non-cirrhosis of CF liver disease

    .

    This study confirms that the specific bile acid profile in CF patients can be used to identify liver diseases
    .
    Among them, GDCA can distinguish patients with non-cirrhotic liver involvement from patients with undetected liver disease

    .
    Therefore, GDCA can be validated as a biomarker for the progression of non-cirrhosis of CF liver disease

    .

    Original source:

    Sławomira Drzymała-Czy.
    Et al.
    Serum bile acids in cystic fibrosis patients – glycodeoxycholic acid as a potential marker of liver disease.
    Digestive and Liver Disease.
    2021.

    Serum bile acids in cystic fibrosis patients – glycodeoxycholic acid as a potential marker of liver disease.


    Leave a message here
    This article is an English version of an article which is originally in the Chinese language on echemi.com and is provided for information purposes only. This website makes no representation or warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness ownership or reliability of the article or any translations thereof. If you have any concerns or complaints relating to the article, please send an email, providing a detailed description of the concern or complaint, to service@echemi.com. A staff member will contact you within 5 working days. Once verified, infringing content will be removed immediately.

    Contact Us

    The source of this page with content of products and services is from Internet, which doesn't represent ECHEMI's opinion. If you have any queries, please write to service@echemi.com. It will be replied within 5 days.

    Moreover, if you find any instances of plagiarism from the page, please send email to service@echemi.com with relevant evidence.