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    Home > Food News > Nutrition News > Exercise protects brain volume by keeping insulin and BMI levels low

    Exercise protects brain volume by keeping insulin and BMI levels low

    • Last Update: 2022-05-28
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    Exercise protects brain volume by keeping insulin and BMI levels low

    MINNEAPOLIS — Exercise helps protect brain cells, research shows
    .
    A new study explores the mechanism of this relationship, suggesting that the role exercise plays in maintaining insulin and body mass index levels may help preserve brain volume, which could help stave off dementia

    .
    The study was published in the April 13, 2022 online issue of Neurology?, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology

    .

    "These results can help us understand how physical activity affects brain health, which could guide us in developing strategies to prevent or delay age-related declines in memory and thinking skills," said study author Dr.
    Géraldine Poisnel, Caen, France Inserm Research Center

    .
    "Cardiovascular benefits in physically active older adults may lead to greater structural brain integrity

    .
    "

    In contrast, the researchers found that the relationship between exercise and brain glucose metabolism was not affected by insulin or body mass index (BMI) levels
    .
    Decreased glucose metabolism in the brains of people with dementia

    .

    The study involved 134 people with an average age of 69 who had no memory problems
    .
    These people filled out questionnaires about their physical activity in the past year

    .
    They used brain scans to measure volume and glucose metabolism

    .
    They collected information on BMI, insulin levels, cholesterol, blood pressure and other factors

    .

    People who were the most physically active had more total gray matter in their brains than those who were the least physically active, averaging about 550,000 cubic millimeters, compared with about 540,000 millimeters in the least physically active people
    .
    When the researchers looked only at the brain regions affected by Alzheimer's disease, they found the same results

    .

    Those who were the most active also had a higher average rate of glucose metabolism in the brain than those who were the least active
    .

    Higher physical activity was not associated with the amount of amyloid plaques in people's brains
    .
    Amyloid plaques are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease

    .

    More research is needed to understand the mechanisms behind these relationships, Poponel said
    .
    "Maintaining a lower body mass index through physical activity can help prevent the disturbances in insulin metabolism, which are common during aging, to promote brain health," Poponel said

    .

    The study did not prove that exercise protects brain volume
    .
    It only shows one association

    .

    A limitation of the study is that people reported their physical activity, so they may not remember it accurately
    .

    This research was supported by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme, the Normandy Region and the MMA Foundation for Future Entrepreneurs
    .

    Learn more about brain health at BrainandLife.
    org, the home page of the American Academy of Neurology's free patient and caregiver journal, which focuses on the intersection of neurological disease and brain health

    .
    Follow Brain & Life? on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

    .

    When you post about this research on social media, we encourage you to use the hashtags #neurology and #ascience
    .

    The American Academy of Neurology is the world's largest association of neurologists and neuroscience professionals, with more than 38,000 members
    .
    AAN is committed to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurological care

    .
    A neurologist is a doctor specially trained in diagnosing, treating, and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system, such as Alzheimer's, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, concussion, Parkinson's, and epilepsy

    .

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