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    Home > Food News > Nutrition News > High blood pressure in older women linked to certain oral bacteria

    High blood pressure in older women linked to certain oral bacteria

    • Last Update: 2022-04-28
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    Some oral bacteria are linked to high blood pressure in older women, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Heart Association

    .

    • A study of more than 1,200 U.
      S.
      women with an average age of 63 found that 10 oral bacteria were associated with a higher risk of high blood pressure, while five were associated with a lower risk

      .

    • Observational studies cannot prove cause and effect; however, the findings underscore the possibility of enhancing hypertension prevention through targeted oral care, the researchers said
      .

    Some oral bacteria are linked to the development of high blood pressure, also known as high blood pressure in postmenopausal women, according to a new study published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association
    .
    The Journal of the American Heart Association is an open access, peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association

    .

    High blood pressure is usually defined by two measurements: systolic blood pressure (the upper value of the pressure measured when the heart beats) of 130 mm Hg or higher, and diastolic blood pressure (the lower value of the pressure between the heart beats) of 80 mm Hg or more high
    .

    While previous research has shown that people with periodontal disease tend to have higher blood pressure than those without it, the researchers believe this study is the first to prospectively examine the relationship between oral bacteria and high blood pressure
    .

    "Since periodontal disease and hypertension are particularly prevalent in older adults, if the relationship between oral bacteria and hypertension risk can be identified, there is an opportunity to enhance hypertension prevention through increased targeted oral care
    .
    " Michael J.
    Dr.
    LaMonte, MPH, one of the study's senior authors, a research professor of epidemiology at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and co-investigator of the Women's Health Initiative Clinical Center in the University's Division of Epidemiology and Environmental Health

    .

    In the Buffalo Osteoporosis and Periodontal Disease Study in Buffalo, New York, researchers evaluated data from 1,215 postmenopausal women (mean age 63 at study enrollment from 1997 to 2001)
    .
    At study enrollment, the researchers recorded blood pressure and collected oral plaque below the gum line, "which is where some bacteria keep the gums and tooth structure healthy, while others cause gum and periodontal disease," Lamont said.
    say

    .
    They also looked at medication use, medical and life>
    .

    At study enrollment, about 35 percent (429) of study participants had normal blood pressure: less than 120/80 mmHg in the absence of blood pressure medication
    .
    Nearly 24% (306) of participants had elevated blood pressure: greater than 120/80 mmHg in the absence of medication

    .
    About 40% (480) of the participants were classified as prevalent treatment of hypertension: diagnosis and treatment of hypertension with medication

    .

    The researchers identified 245 unique bacteria in the plaque samples
    .
    Nearly one-third of women who did not have high blood pressure at the start of the study or were not receiving high blood pressure treatment were diagnosed with high blood pressure during an average of 10 years of follow-up

    .

    The analysis found:

    • 10 bacteria that increase the risk of high blood pressure by 10% to 16%; and

    • Five other bacteria were associated with a 9% to 18% lower risk of high blood pressure
      .

    These results were consistent even after accounting for demographic, clinical, and life>
    .

    The researchers analyzed the potential associations of these 15 bacteria with high blood pressure risk and compared women younger than 65 with women over 65; smokers and non-smokers; normotensives and those with elevated blood pressure at the start of the study.
    people, and other comparisons

    .
    The results of the comparison between the two groups remained the same

    .

    The finding is especially important for postmenopausal women because older women have higher rates of hypertension than older men, Lamont said
    .

    More than 70 percent of U.
    S.
    adults age 65 and older have high blood pressure

    .
    According to the 2020 U.
    S.
    Census report, by 2060, the population of this age group is expected to reach 95 million, with twice as many women as men

    .
    The 2020 Surgeon General's Call to Action to Control Hypertension highlights the serious public health problem that high blood pressure poses to adults, especially middle-aged adults

    .
    Therefore, identifying new ways to prevent this disease is crucial in an aging society

    .

    According to the American Heart Association, nearly half of American adults have high blood pressure, and many do not know they have it
    .
    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke

    .

    "We've come to realize that it's not just the traditional risk factors that we know are very important that affect health
    .
    This paper reminds us of the need to expand our understanding of other health factors that may even be influenced by our environment and may It affects our biology at the endothelial level,

    " said Willie Lawrence, MD, chair of the American Heart Association's National Hypertension Control Initiative (NHCI) Oversight Committee
    .
    Inclusive research into hypertension must continue to be a priority in order to better understand and address hypertension

    .
    "

    Because the study used an observational approach, causality could not be inferred, limiting the researchers' ability to determine that only some bacteria were associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure, while others were associated with a higher risk of high blood pressure
    .
    A randomized trial will provide the necessary evidence to confirm which bacteria are responsible for the development or absence of high blood pressure over time, LaMonte said

    .


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