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    Home > Food News > Nutrition News > Hyperbaric oxygen therapy holds promise for opioid addiction

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy holds promise for opioid addiction

    • Last Update: 2022-05-28
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    The research team recruited participants in a local opioid treatment program to test the effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy
    .
    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy requires breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized environment

    .

    Published in Addiction Nursing, the first paper describes a pilot study of 31 participants showing that those receiving hyperbaric oxygen therapy as part of a program of methadone cones were able to maintain a significantly reduced dose of 4.
    3 mg three months after the study, By comparison, untreated participants took 0.
    25 mg

    .
    They also reported half the levels of withdrawal symptoms experienced by the control group participants after a day of hyperbaric oxygen treatment

    .

    "While methadone helps opioid-addicted people stabilize and return to normal life, it's still the opioid they take every day," said study co-author Matthew Layton, a professor at Washington State University.
    Professor at the WSU Elson S.
    Floyd College of Medicine and former medical director of the Opioid Treatment Program

    .
    "About half of the patients treated wanted to stop using methadone for a variety of reasons, but many tried, failed and relapsed

    .
    Our findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen therapy can be used as a non-pharmacological tool to help people Discontinue methadone therapy

    .
    "

    The second study, published in the journal Pain Management Nursing, was a small randomized controlled trial of eight participants that looked more closely at the relief of withdrawal symptoms
    .
    The study found that participants in the hyperbaric oxygen treatment group reported lower pain intensity and cravings for medication compared to the control group, who were given a mixture of oxygen equivalent to room air at normal atmospheric pressure

    .
    The researchers also found improvements in other outcomes, such as sleep quality and mood

    .

    "While some of the challenges lie with methadone, for others it's difficult to stay in treatment early because finding the right dose to stabilize symptoms is difficult to achieve," said first author Marian Wilson, associate professor and specialist in pain management and opioids at Washington State University's School of Nursing Substance use disorder
    .
    "As a result, many people experience withdrawal symptoms during the adaptation period that are severe enough to cause them to restart illicit medication or withdraw from treatment

    .
    "

    Based on the joint findings of the two studies, the researchers are seeking funding for a clinical trial to confirm their findings in a larger sample of participants who will be followed for several years
    .

    The idea for the two studies came from earlier work by a Washington State University researcher showing that hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduced pain in mice and reduced physical signs of opioid withdrawal
    .

    "We were curious to see if it could work in humans," said study co-author Raymond Quick, a professor in Washington State University's College of Arts and Sciences
    .

    If their findings are confirmed in a larger clinical trial, hyperbaric oxygen therapy could become a nonpharmacological tool that providers can use to help people manage pain and potentially reduce opioid use
    .

    "Last year, during the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 100,000 people died from the opioid epidemic," Leighton said
    .
    "This shows us that opioid addiction is still a very serious problem, and we need to find Better way to solve this problem

    .
    "

    In addition to Layton, Wilson, Quick and others at WSU, collaborators on these studies include Karen Steinick, medical director of the Spokane Hyperbaric Oxygen Center, and Alvina Jessie, program manager for the Spokane Regional Health District
    .

    Funding for this work came from Washington State Initiative Measure 171, which is administered by the university's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program
    .

    Journal Reference :

    1. Marian Wilson, Tamara Odom-Maryon, Karen Stanek, Trevor Roush, Joseph Muriungi, Alvina Jesse, Raymond M.
      Quock, Matthew Layton.
      Hyperbaric Oxygen to Assist Adults With Opioid Use Disorder in Reducing Methadone Dose .
      Journal of Adddictions Nursing , 2022; 33 (1): 27 DOI: 10.
      1097/JAN.
      0000000000000447


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