echemi logo
Product
  • Product
  • Supplier
  • Inquiry
    Home > Food News > Nutrition News > If your blood pressure rises when you stand, you may be at risk of a heart attack

    If your blood pressure rises when you stand, you may be at risk of a heart attack

    • Last Update: 2022-04-25
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
    Search more information of high quality chemicals, good prices and reliable suppliers, visit www.echemi.com

    The study's lead author, Dr.
    Paolo Palatini, professor of internal medicine at the University of Padova in Italy, said: "This finding may justify early initiation of antihypertensive treatment, including medication, in patients with exaggerated blood pressure responses on standing

    .
    "

    Nearly half of Americans and about 40 percent of the world's population suffer from high blood pressure, which is considered the world's leading preventable cause of death
    .
    According to the American Heart Association's 2022 Heart Disease Statistics, middle-aged people with high blood pressure are five times more likely to have impaired cognitive function, decreased executive function, dementia and Alzheimer's disease ( Alzheimer's disease) is twice as likely as normal

    .

    Typically, systolic blood pressure (upper limit) drops slightly while standing
    .
    In this study, the researchers assessed whether the opposite response -- a marked increase in systolic blood pressure while standing -- is a risk factor for heart attack and other serious cardiovascular events

    .

    The researchers evaluated 1,207 people who participated in the HARVEST study
    .
    The HARVEST study is a prospective study that began in Italy in 1990 in untreated adults 18-45 years of age with stage 1 hypertension

    .
    Stage 1 hypertension was defined as a systolic blood pressure of 140 - 159 mmHg and/or a diastolic blood pressure of 90 - 100 mmHg

    .
    There were no blood pressure lowering medications before the study, and all were initially estimated to be at low risk based on their life>
    .
    At the time of registration, the average age of the participants was 33 years, 72% were male, and all were white

    .

    At enrollment, each participant had blood pressure measured six times in different body positions, including after lying down and standing up
    .
    The 120 participants with the highest blood pressure increases (the top 10 percent) had a mean increase of 11.
    4 mmHg while standing; all patients in this group had blood pressure increases greater than 6.
    5 mmHg

    .
    The remaining subjects experienced an average drop in systolic blood pressure of 3.
    8 mmHg while standing

    .
    The researchers compared the two groups of participants for heart disease risk factors, laboratory measures, major cardiovascular events (heart attack, heart-related chest pain, stroke, aortic aneurysm, peripheral artery occlusion), and chronic kidney disease

    .
    In some analyses, the development of atrial fibrillation, a cardiac arrhythmia, was also noted as a major risk factor for stroke

    .
    Results were adjusted for age, sex, parental history of heart disease, some life>
    .

    During a mean follow-up of 17 years, 105 major cardiovascular events occurred
    .
    The most common are heart attack, heart-related chest pain, and stroke

    .

    The top 10% have elevated blood pressure:

    • Almost twice as likely to have major cardiovascular disease as the other participants;

    • There was generally no higher risk of cardiovascular events (exaggerated blood pressure response while standing) at initial assessment;

    • more likely to be smokers (32.
      1% vs 19.
      9% ​​in the non-rising group), but with comparable levels of physical activity, they were less likely to be overweight or obese, and less likely to have a family history of cardiovascular events;

    • better cholesterol levels (lower total cholesterol, higher HDL cholesterol);

    • Systolic blood pressure was lower when lying down than in the other group (140.
      5 mm Hg and 146.
      0 mm Hg, respectively), while blood pressure measurements over 24 hours were higher

      .

    Exaggerated blood pressure response on standing remained an independent predictor of adverse cardiac events or stroke after adjusting for 24-hour mean blood pressure
    .

    "The findings confirm our original hypothesis that a significant increase in blood pressure from lying to standing is important for prognosis in hypertensive young adults
    .
    We were rather surprised that even the relatively small increase in standing blood pressure ( 6-7 mm Hg), also predicts major cardiac events in the long term

    .
    Among

    the 630 participants who were tested for stress hormones in 24-hour urine samples, those with elevated blood pressure had higher adrenaline/creatinine ratios than those without elevated blood pressure (118.
    4 nmol/mol and 77.
    0 nmol/mol)

    .

    "Adrenaline levels are an estimate of the overall effect of stressful stimulation over a 24-hour period
    .
    This suggests that those with the highest blood pressure while standing may have a stronger sympathetic response (fight or flight response) to the stressor," Palatini said

    .
    "Overall, this leads to an increase in mean blood pressure

    .
    "

    "Research suggests that blood pressure stations should be measured in order to tailor treatment in hypertensive patients, and it is possible that more aggressive life>
    .

    The findings of this study may not apply to people from other racial or ethnic groups, as all study participants reported white race/ethnicity
    .
    In addition, there were not enough women in the sample to analyze whether the association between elevated standing blood pressure and adverse cardiac events differed between men and women

    .
    Because of the relatively low number of major adverse cardiac events in this sample of young adults, this result needs to be confirmed in a larger study

    .

    Journal Reference :

    1. Paolo Palatini, Lucio Mos, Francesca Saladini, Marcello Rattazzi.
      Blood Pressure Hyperreactivity to Standing: a Predictor of Adverse Outcome in Young Hypertensive Patients .
      Hypertension , 2022; DOI: 10.
      1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.
      121.
      18579


    This article is an English version of an article which is originally in the Chinese language on echemi.com and is provided for information purposes only. This website makes no representation or warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness ownership or reliability of the article or any translations thereof. If you have any concerns or complaints relating to the article, please send an email, providing a detailed description of the concern or complaint, to service@echemi.com. A staff member will contact you within 5 working days. Once verified, infringing content will be removed immediately.

    Contact Us

    The source of this page with content of products and services is from Internet, which doesn't represent ECHEMI's opinion. If you have any queries, please write to service@echemi.com. It will be replied within 5 days.

    Moreover, if you find any instances of plagiarism from the page, please send email to service@echemi.com with relevant evidence.