echemi logo
Product
  • Product
  • Supplier
  • Inquiry
    Home > Active Ingredient News > Endocrine System > Is it true to lose weight with a smile?

    Is it true to lose weight with a smile?

    • Last Update: 2022-05-13
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
    Search more information of high quality chemicals, good prices and reliable suppliers, visit www.echemi.com

    Metabolic syndrome is a combination of (visceral) obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and dyslipidemia that predisposes to cerebrovascular and heart disease
    .
    The relationship between metabolic syndrome and life>
    .

    Metabolic syndrome is a combination of (visceral) obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and dyslipidemia that predisposes to cerebrovascular and heart disease
    .
    The relationship between metabolic syndrome and life>
    .

    Therefore, a reduction in psychological stress may improve metabolic syndrome and reduce the risk of death from cerebrovascular disease and heart disease
    .

    Therefore, a reduction in psychological stress may improve metabolic syndrome and reduce the risk of death from cerebrovascular disease and heart disease
    .
    Therefore, a reduction in psychological stress may improve metabolic syndrome and reduce the risk of death from cerebrovascular disease and heart disease
    .

    However, since Norman Cousins ​​published a report on the effects of laughter on pain relief in 1976, the effects of laughter have received more attention, and there has been more attention to the relationship between laughter and health, laughter and disease.
    Contacts have conducted extensive research

    .
    In a large prospective study reporting that enjoying life can significantly reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, people who laughed less than every day had a 1.
    21 times higher risk of heart disease than those who laughed every day

    .

    However, since Norman Cousins ​​published a report on the effects of laughter on pain relief in 1976, the effects of laughter have received more attention, and there has been more attention to the relationship between laughter and health, laughter and disease.
    Contacts have conducted extensive research

    .
    In a large prospective study reporting that enjoying life can significantly reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, people who laughed less than every day had a 1.
    21 times higher risk of heart disease than those who laughed every day

    .

    Therefore, laughter may be associated not only with longevity, but also with extended healthy lifespan
    .
    While there have been some intervention studies on the psychological effects of laughter, few studies have examined both psychological and physical effects
    .
    This study investigated the effects of laughter on body weight, body mass index (BMI), subjective stress, depression, and health-related quality of life ( HRQOL ) in Japanese community residents through a randomized controlled trial
    .

    Therefore, laughter may be associated not only with longevity, but also with extended healthy lifespan
    .
    This study investigated the effects of laughter on body weight, body mass index (BMI), subjective stress, depression, and health-related quality of life ( HRQOL ) in Japanese community residents through a randomized controlled trial
    .
    HRQOL

    Characteristics of Participants at Baseline

    Characteristics of Participants at Baseline

    235 participants (37 men and 198 women) aged 43 to 79 years were eligible for inclusion
    .
    The flowchart in Figure 1 shows that these 235 participants were randomly divided into a laughing group and a control group (n = 117 and n = 118)
    .
    The baseline characteristics of the participants are shown in Table 2
    .
    Participants were predominantly female (84.
    3%) and over 60 years old (80.
    4%)

    .
    There was no difference between the laughter and control groups at baseline, with an average attendance rate of over 84.
    8%

    .

    235 participants (37 men and 198 women) aged 43 to 79 years were eligible for inclusion
    .
    The flowchart in Figure 1 shows that these 235 participants were randomly divided into a laughing group and a control group (n = 117 and n = 118)
    .
    The baseline characteristics of the participants are shown in Table 2
    .
    Participants were predominantly female (84.
    3%) and over 60 years old (80.
    4%)

    .
    There was no difference between the laughter and control groups at baseline, with an average attendance rate of over 84.
    8%

    .

    Weight, abdominal circumference and mental health

    Weight, abdominal circumference and mental health

    Changes in baseline variables, 12-week follow-up examinations, and intervention effects of the laughter program in the laughter and control groups are shown in Table 3
    .
    The intervention effects on body weight and BMI were significant in both groups (p = 0.
    008, p = 0.
    006)

    .
    Abdominal circumference did not decrease significantly
    .
    There were significant improvements in subjective psychological stress score (p = 0.
    004), LOT-R score (p = 0.
    03), and subjective well-being score (p = 0.
    002)

    .
    In addition, PCS scores (p = 0.
    04), physical function scores (p = 0.
    02), role body scores (p = 0.
    03), and mental health scores (p = 0.
    02) were all significantly improved

    .

    Changes in baseline variables, 12-week follow-up examinations, and intervention effects of the laughter program in the laughter and control groups are shown in Table 3
    .
    The intervention effects on body weight and BMI were significant in both groups (p = 0.
    008, p = 0.
    006)

    .
    Abdominal circumference did not decrease significantly
    .
    There were significant improvements in subjective psychological stress score (p = 0.
    004), LOT-R score (p = 0.
    03), and subjective well-being score (p = 0.
    002)

    .
    In addition, PCS scores (p = 0.
    04), physical function scores (p = 0.
    02), role body scores (p = 0.
    03), and mental health scores (p = 0.
    02) were all significantly improved

    .

    In addition, changes in body pain, general health perception, vitality, and role mood tended to increase (p = 0.
    09, p = 0.
    09, p = 0.
    07, and p = 0.
    06)

    .
    HRQOL social functioning and MCS scores were not significantly improved
    .

    In addition, changes in body pain, general health perception, vitality, and role mood tended to increase (p = 0.
    09, p = 0.
    09, p = 0.
    07, and p = 0.
    06)

    .
    HRQOL

    Forest plot for combined analysis

    Forest plot for combined analysis

    Figure 2 shows a forest plot of mean changes in BMI, subjective stress, PCS, MCS, and subjective well-being by region, gender, and age from baseline to 12-week follow-up in the laughter and control groups
    .
    Body mass index and subjective stress scores showed similar decreasing trends across regions, genders, and ages

    .
    There was a similar upward trend in PCS scores by region, female and age

    .

    Figure 2 shows a forest plot of mean changes in BMI, subjective stress, PCS, MCS, and subjective well-being by region, gender, and age from baseline to 12-week follow-up in the laughter and control groups
    .
    Body mass index and subjective stress scores showed similar decreasing trends across regions, genders, and ages

    .
    There was a similar upward trend in PCS scores by region, female and age

    .

    In addition, there were similar upward trends in MCS and subjective well-being scores across regions, genders, and ages
    .

    In addition, there were similar upward trends in MCS and subjective well-being scores across regions, genders, and ages
    .
    In addition, there were similar upward trends in MCS and subjective well-being scores across regions, genders, and ages
    .

    Relationship between BMI and PCS score change

    Relationship between BMI and PCS score change

    The study analyzed the relationship between BMI and changes in psychological indices such as subjective stress, HRQOL, and subjective well-being in the laughter group
    .
    Changes in BMI were significantly negatively correlated with changes in PCS (r = −0.
    19, p = 0.
    04), but other indicators were not significantly correlated

    .
    The relationship between BMI change and PCS score in the laughing group is shown in Figure 3

    .

    The study analyzed the relationship between BMI and changes in psychological indices such as subjective stress, HRQOL, and subjective well-being in the laughter group
    .
    Changes in BMI were significantly negatively correlated with changes in PCS (r = −0.
    19, p = 0.
    04), but other indicators were not significantly correlated

    .
    The relationship between BMI change and PCS score in the laughing group is shown in Figure 3

    .

    No injuries or side effects occurred throughout the trial
    .

    No injuries or side effects occurred throughout the trial
    .

    The present study showed that a 12-week comprehensive laughter program in 8-10 classes significantly improved the physical and psychological functioning of Japanese community residents, such as body weight, BMI, subjective stress, subjective well-being, and risk factors for metabolic syndrome such as HRQOL
    .
    In addition, participants with reduced BMI after the intervention also had improved PCS scores, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between improvements in HRQOL and obesity
    .

    The present study showed that a 12-week comprehensive laughter program in 8-10 classes significantly improved the physical and psychological functioning of Japanese community residents, such as body weight, BMI, subjective stress, subjective well-being, and risk factors for metabolic syndrome such as HRQOL
    .
    In addition, participants with reduced BMI after the intervention also had improved PCS scores, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between improvements in HRQOL and obesity
    .

     

    Original source:

    Original source:

    Funakubo N, Eguchi E, Hayashi R, et al.
    Effects of a laughter program on body weight and mental health among Japanese people with metabolic syndrome risk factors: a randomized controlled trial.
     
    BMC Geriatr .
    2022;22:361.
    Published 2022 Apr 23 .
    doi: 10.
    1186/s12877-022-03038-y.

    Funakubo N, Eguchi E, Hayashi R, et al.
    Effects of a laughter program on body weight and mental health among Japanese people with metabolic syndrome risk factors: a randomized controlled trial.
     
    BMC Geriatr .
    2022;22:361.
    Published 2022 Apr 23 .
    doi: 10.
    1186/s12877-022-03038-y.
    BMC Geriatr

    leave a message here
    This article is an English version of an article which is originally in the Chinese language on echemi.com and is provided for information purposes only. This website makes no representation or warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness ownership or reliability of the article or any translations thereof. If you have any concerns or complaints relating to the article, please send an email, providing a detailed description of the concern or complaint, to service@echemi.com. A staff member will contact you within 5 working days. Once verified, infringing content will be removed immediately.

    Related Articles

    Contact Us

    The source of this page with content of products and services is from Internet, which doesn't represent ECHEMI's opinion. If you have any queries, please write to service@echemi.com. It will be replied within 5 days.

    Moreover, if you find any instances of plagiarism from the page, please send email to service@echemi.com with relevant evidence.