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    Home > Active Ingredient News > Endocrine System > JCEM: Non-alcoholic fatty liver and fibrosis progression are associated with the risk of chronic kidney disease

    JCEM: Non-alcoholic fatty liver and fibrosis progression are associated with the risk of chronic kidney disease

    • Last Update: 2021-07-29
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    The relationship between the evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not yet clear
    .

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver

    Recently, a research article was published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, an authoritative journal in the field of endocrine and metabolic diseases.
    Researchers aimed to assess the relationship between changes in NALFD status and the progression of NAFLD fibrosis and the risk of CKD

    .

    The researchers conducted a community-based prospective study.
    Participants included participants who were 40 years of age or older and had no CKD at baseline in 2010, and were followed up after an average of 4.
    4 years

    .
    NAFLD is diagnosed by ultrasound

    .
    The NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS) is used to assess the stage and progression of fibrosis

    .
    CKD is defined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or urine albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR)

    .
    All measurements were taken during baseline and follow-up examinations

    .

    Correlation between CKD event risk and NAFLD status change

    Among the 4042 participants, compared with non-NAFLD patients, NAFLD was associated with an increased risk of CKD (odds ratio, OR=1.
    44, 95% confidence interval [CI] of 1.
    003-2.
    06; P=0.
    048), except for the baseline level , Also adjusted for confounding factors, including
    the evolution of
    diabetes , hypertension, and obesity
    .
    However, there was no significant difference in the risk of CKD between patients with NAFLD elimination and NAFLD persistence

    .
    Among the 534 participants with persistent NAFLD, compared with stable patients with low NFS fibrosis, fibrosis patients who progressed from low NFS to moderate or high NFS had a significantly increased risk of developing CKD (OR=2.
    82, 95 %CI is 1.
    22-6.
    56; P=0.
    016)

    .

    diabetes

    It can be seen that NAFLD and fibrosis progression are associated with an increased risk of CKD
    .

    The progression of NAFLD and fibrosis is associated with an increased risk of CKD
    .

    Original source:

    Original source:

    Guangmin Zuo.
    et al.
    New Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Fibrosis Progression Associate With the Risk of Incident Chronic Kidney Disease .
    JCEM.
    2021.
    https://doi.
    org/10.
    1210/clinem/dgab425

    New Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Fibrosis Progression Associate With the Risk of Incident Chronic Kidney Disease

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