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    Home > Active Ingredient News > Antitumor Therapy > JNCCN: The risk of tumor-specific death in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs)

    JNCCN: The risk of tumor-specific death in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs)

    • Last Update: 2021-06-10
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are gradually becoming familiar to people.
    NETs are a kind of highly specific tumors with variable biological behavior, clinical and prognostic characteristics.
    However, the information on the tumor burden, tumor-specific death and prognostic factors caused by neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is not very clear.
    Therefore, a research team from Canada conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the cumulative incidence of tumor-specific and non-tumor deaths in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).
    Related research results were published in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (JNCCN).

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are gradually becoming familiar to people.
    NETs are a kind of highly specific tumors with variable biological behavior, clinical and prognostic characteristics.
    However, the information on the tumor burden, tumor-specific death and prognostic factors caused by neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is not very clear.
    Therefore, a research team from Canada conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the cumulative incidence of tumor-specific and non-tumor deaths in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).
    Related research results were published in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (JNCCN).

    The study is a population-based retrospective cohort study that included patients with NETs registered in Canada from 2001 to 2015.
    To evaluate the cumulative incidence of tumor-specific death and non-tumor death in patients with primary NETs and different metastatic states.
    A total of 8607 patients were enrolled in the study, with a median follow-up of 42 months (range: 17-82 months).
    The most common primary tumor
    site was bronchopulmonary (22.
    8%), followed by the small intestine (19.
    3%) and rectum (14.
    4%).
    42.
    2% of patients had metastases, including 32.
    0% of patients had concurrent metastases.

    The study is a population-based retrospective cohort study that included patients with NETs registered in Canada from 2001 to 2015.
    To evaluate the cumulative incidence of tumor-specific death and non-tumor death in patients with primary NETs and different metastatic states.
    A total of 8607 patients were enrolled in the study, with a median follow-up of 42 months (range: 17-82 months).
    The most common
    primary tumor is the bronchopulmonary (22.
    8%), followed by the small intestine (19.
    3%) and rectum (14.
    4%).
    42.
    2% of patients had metastases, including 32.
    0% of patients had concurrent metastases.
    The location is bronchopulmonary (22.
    8%), followed by the small intestine (19.
    3%) and rectum (14.
    4%).

    The 5-year risk of tumor-specific death in the overall population of NETs is higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths, with mortality rates of 7.
    3% (95% CI, 26.
    3%–28.
    4%) and 5.
    6% (95% CI, 5.
    1%–6.
    1%), respectively .
    The 10-year tumor-specific mortality and non-tumor-related mortality were 34.
    5% (95% CI, 33.
    2%–35.
    8%) and 10.
    3% (95% CI, 9.
    4%–11.
    3%), respectively.
    Patients with NETs with metastases, including simultaneous and metachronous metastases, have a higher tumor-specific mortality rate than non-tumor-related deaths.
    In patients with NETs without metastasis, the proportion of death patterns in the two groups was similar.

    The 5-year risk of tumor-specific death in the overall population of NETs is higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths, with mortality rates of 7.
    3% (95% CI, 26.
    3%–28.
    4%) and 5.
    6% (95% CI, 5.
    1%–6.
    1%), respectively .
    The 10-year tumor-specific mortality and non-tumor-related mortality were 34.
    5% (95% CI, 33.
    2%–35.
    8%) and 10.
    3% (95% CI, 9.
    4%–11.
    3%), respectively.
    Patients with NETs with metastases, including simultaneous and metachronous metastases, have a higher tumor-specific mortality rate than non-tumor-related deaths.
    In patients with NETs without metastasis, the proportion of death patterns in the two groups was similar.
    The 5-year risk of tumor-specific death in the overall population of NETs is higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths, with mortality rates of 7.
    3% (95% CI, 26.
    3%–28.
    4%) and 5.
    6% (95% CI, 5.
    1%–6.
    1%), respectively .
    The 10-year tumor-specific mortality and non-tumor-related mortality were 34.
    5% (95% CI, 33.
    2%–35.
    8%) and 10.
    3% (95% CI, 9.
    4%–11.
    3%), respectively.
    The 5-year risk of tumor-specific death in the overall population of NETs is higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths, with mortality rates of 7.
    3% (95% CI, 26.
    3%–28.
    4%) and 5.
    6% (95% CI, 5.
    1%–6.
    1%), respectively .
    The 10-year tumor-specific mortality and non-tumor-related mortality were 34.
    5% (95% CI, 33.
    2%–35.
    8%) and 10.
    3% (95% CI, 9.
    4%–11.
    3%), respectively.

                        NETs overall population tumor and non-tumor mortality

    NETs overall population tumor and non-tumor mortality

    The tumor-specific mortality rate of patients with primary bronchopulmonary NTEs was the highest.
    The 5-year and 10-year tumor-specific mortality rates were 36.
    4% (95% CI, 34.
    2%–38.
    7%) and 42.
    7% (95% CI, 0.
    1), respectively.
    %–45.
    3%).
    The tumor-specific mortality of patients with metastatic and non-metastatic bronchopulmonary NTEs was higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths.

    The tumor-specific mortality rate of patients with primary bronchopulmonary NTEs was the highest.
    The 5-year and 10-year tumor-specific mortality rates were 36.
    4% (95% CI, 34.
    2%–38.
    7%) and 42.
    7% (95% CI, 0.
    1), respectively.
    %–45.
    3%).
    The tumor-specific mortality of patients with metastatic and non-metastatic bronchopulmonary NTEs was higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths.
    The tumor-specific mortality rate of patients with primary bronchopulmonary NTEs was the highest.
    The 5-year and 10-year tumor-specific mortality rates were 36.
    4% (95% CI, 34.
    2%–38.
    7%) and 42.
    7% (95% CI, 0.
    1), respectively.
    %–45.
    3%).
    The tumor-specific mortality of patients with metastatic and non-metastatic bronchopulmonary NTEs was higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths.

                 Tumor-specific and non-tumor deaths in patients with primary bronchopulmonary NTEs

       Tumor-specific and non-tumor deaths in patients with primary bronchopulmonary NTEs

    The 5-year and 10-year tumor-specific mortality rates of patients with primary pancreatic NETs were 34.
    8% [95% CI, 31.
    5%–38.
    2%] and 48.
    4% [95% CI, 43.
    5%–53.
    0%], respectively.
    The tumor-specific mortality of patients with metastatic and non-metastatic pancreatic NTEs was higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths.

    The 5-year and 10-year tumor-specific mortality rates of patients with primary pancreatic NETs were 34.
    8% [95% CI, 31.
    5%–38.
    2%] and 48.
    4% [95% CI, 43.
    5%–53.
    0%], respectively.
    The tumor-specific mortality of patients with metastatic and non-metastatic pancreatic NTEs was higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths.
    The 5-year and 10-year tumor-specific mortality rates of patients with primary pancreatic NETs were 34.
    8% [95% CI, 31.
    5%–38.
    2%] and 48.
    4% [95% CI, 43.
    5%–53.
    0%], respectively.
    The tumor-specific mortality of patients with metastatic and non-metastatic pancreatic NTEs was higher than that of non-tumor-related deaths.

                Tumor-specific and non-tumor deaths in patients with primary pancreatic NTEs

    Tumor-specific and non-tumor deaths in patients with primary pancreatic NTEs

    The 5-year and 10-year tumor-specific mortality rates of patients with primary colonic NETs were 21.
    4% [95% CI, 18.
    9%–24.
    0%] and 26.
    6% [95% CI, 23.
    4%–29.
    9%], respectively.
    For patients with non-metastatic NTEs, non-tumor-related mortality is higher than tumor-specific mortality.
    For example
    , the 5-year and 10-year non-tumor-related mortality rates of patients with non-metastatic gastric NETs were 10.
    4% (95% CI, 7.
    1%–14.
    4%) and 18.
    9% (95% CI, 13.
    4%–25.
    2%), respectively.
    The specific mortality rates were 5.
    8% (95%CI, 3.
    5%–8.
    9%) and 9.
    0% (95%CI, 5.
    1%–14.
    3%), respectively.
    The 5-year and 10-year non-tumor-related mortality rates of
    patients with non-metastatic small bowel NETs were 13.
    0% (95% CI, 10.
    2%-16.
    0%) and 22.
    4% (95% CI, 17.
    7%-27.
    4%), respectively; while tumor-specific The sexual mortality rates were 4.
    7% (95% CI, 3.
    1%–6.
    7%) and 8.
    6% (95% CI, 5.
    7%–12.
    3%), respectively.
    The 5-year and 10-year non-tumor-related mortality rates of
    patients with non-metastatic colonic NETs were 6.
    4% (95% CI, 4.
    5%–8.
    8%) and 11.
    4% (95% CI, 7.
    9%–15.
    6%), respectively; while tumor-specific The sexual mortality rates were 4.
    1% (95% CI, 2.
    7%–5.
    9%) and 5.
    9% (95% CI, 3.
    8%–8.
    6%).
    The 5-year and 10-year non-tumor-related mortality rates of
    patients with non-metastatic rectal NETs were 2.
    7% (95% CI, 1.
    8%-3.
    9%) and 6.
    6% (95% CI, 4.
    7%-9.
    0%), respectively; while tumor-specific The sexual mortality rates were 7.
    4% (95% CI, 5.
    9%–8.
    9%) and 9.
    3% (95% CI, 7.
    4%–11.
    4%), respectively.

    The 5-year and 10-year tumor-specific mortality rates of patients with primary colonic NETs were 21.
    4% [95% CI, 18.
    9%–24.
    0%] and 26.
    6% [95% CI, 23.
    4%–29.
    9%], respectively.
    For patients with non-metastatic NTEs, non-tumor-related mortality is higher than tumor-specific mortality.
    For example
    , the 5-year and 10-year non-tumor-related mortality rates of patients with non-metastatic gastric NETs were 10.
    4% (95% CI, 7.
    1%–14.
    4%) and 18.
    9% (95% CI, 13.
    4%–25.
    2%), respectively.
    The specific mortality rates were 5.
    8% (95%CI, 3.
    5%–8.
    9%) and 9.
    0% (95%CI, 5.
    1%–14.
    3%), respectively.
    The 5-year and 10-year non-tumor-related mortality rates of
    patients with non-metastatic small bowel NETs were 13.
    0% (95% CI, 10.
    2%-16.
    0%) and 22.
    4% (95% CI, 17.
    7%-27.
    4%), respectively; while tumor-specific The sexual mortality rates were 4.
    7% (95% CI, 3.
    1%–6.
    7%) and 8.
    6% (95% CI, 5.
    7%–12.
    3%), respectively.
    The 5-year and 10-year non-tumor-related mortality rates of
    patients with non-metastatic colonic NETs were 6.
    4% (95% CI, 4.
    5%–8.
    8%) and 11.
    4% (95% CI, 7.
    9%–15.
    6%), respectively; while tumor-specific The sexual mortality rates were 4.
    1% (95% CI, 2.
    7%–5.
    9%) and 5.
    9% (95% CI, 3.
    8%–8.
    6%).
    The 5-year and 10-year non-tumor-related mortality rates of
    patients with non-metastatic rectal NETs were 2.
    7% (95% CI, 1.
    8%-3.
    9%) and 6.
    6% (95% CI, 4.
    7%-9.
    0%), respectively; while tumor-specific The sexual mortality rates were 7.
    4% (95% CI, 5.
    9%–8.
    9%) and 9.
    3% (95% CI, 7.
    4%–11.
    4%), respectively.
    For patients with non-metastatic NTEs, non-tumor-related mortality is higher than tumor-specific mortality.
    For example, in patients
    with non -metastatic gastric NETs , non-tumor-related mortality is higher than tumor-specific mortality in patients with non-metastatic NTEs.
    Patients with non -metastatic small bowel NETs patients with non-metastatic colon NETs patients with non-metastatic rectal NETs patients

               

                    Tumor-specific and non-tumor deaths in patients with gastrointestinal NTEs

      Tumor-specific and non-tumor deaths in patients with gastrointestinal NTEs

    Multivariate analysis found that old age, substance deprivation, and metastasis were associated with a high tumor-specific death risk, while women and concomitant diseases were associated with a lower tumor-specific death risk.

    Multivariate analysis found that old age, substance deprivation, and metastasis were associated with a high tumor-specific death risk, while women and concomitant diseases were associated with a lower tumor-specific death risk.

    In summary, the overall population of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has a higher risk of tumor-specific death than non-tumor-related deaths.
    There is strong heterogeneity in patients with tumors in different parts.
    For patients with non-metastatic gastrointestinal NETs, ​​non-tumor-related mortality is higher than tumor-specific death.

    In summary, the overall population of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has a higher risk of tumor-specific death than non-tumor-related deaths.
    There is strong heterogeneity in patients with tumors in different parts.
    For patients with non-metastatic gastrointestinal NETs, ​​non-tumor-related mortality is higher than tumor-specific death.
    Patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have a higher risk of tumor-specific death than non-tumor-related deaths.
    There is strong heterogeneity in patients with tumors in different parts.
    For patients with non-metastatic gastrointestinal NETs, ​​non-tumor-related mortality is higher than tumor-specific death.
    Patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have a higher risk of tumor-specific death than non-tumor-related deaths.
    There is strong heterogeneity in patients with tumors in different parts.
    For patients with non-metastatic gastrointestinal NETs, ​​non-tumor-related mortality is higher than tumor-specific death.

    Original source:

    Original source:

    Julie Hallet, Calvin Law, Simron Singh, et al.
    Risk of Cancer-Specific Death for Patients Diagnosed With Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Population-Based Analysis.
    J Natl Compr Canc Netw.
    2021 Jun 4;1-10.
    doi: 10.
    6004/jnccn .
    2020.
    7666.
    Online ahead of print.

    Julie Hallet, Calvin Law, Simron Singh, et al.
    Risk of Cancer-Specific Death for Patients Diagnosed With Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Population-Based Analysis.
    J Natl Compr Canc Netw.
    2021 Jun 4;1-10.
    doi: 10.
    6004/jnccn .
    2020.
    7666.
    Online ahead of print.


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