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    Home > Active Ingredient News > Infection > LANCET: The complete elimination of SARS-CoV-2 can create the best results for health, economy and civil liberties

    LANCET: The complete elimination of SARS-CoV-2 can create the best results for health, economy and civil liberties

    • Last Update: 2021-05-08
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    The choice between different goals is the core of political decision-making.
    Public health, economic growth, democratic solidarity, and civil liberties are important factors in evaluating pandemic response measures.
    There is growing evidence that these goals do not need to conflict with each other when dealing with
    COVID-19 .
    Those countries that have always aimed at eradication—that is, taking maximum action to control SARS-CoV-2 and stopping the spread of the community as soon as possible—in general are making better progress than countries that have adopted mitigation measures, that is, taking targeted measures.
    Increase actions gradually to reduce cases so as not to overwhelm the health care system.

    COVID-19

    MiquelOliu-Barton and others compared the number of deaths, gross domestic product (GDP) growth and the stringency of lockdown measures in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries that aim to eliminate or alleviate the new crown pneumonia epidemic in the 12 months before the pandemic.
    .
    Although all indicators support elimination, their analysis does not prove a causal relationship between different pandemic response strategies and different outcome measures.
    In the OECD countries that choose to eliminate COVID-19 (Australia, Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, and South Korea), the number of deaths per million people is about 25 times lower than other OECD countries that choose to relieve COVID-19.

    Coronavirus disease

    Mortality is representative of the broader burden of disease in a country.
    For example, decision makers should also consider the evidence of increasing long-term morbidity after SARS-CoV-2
    infection .
    There is also a growing
    consensus that in terms of a country’s economic performance, elimination is better than mitigation.
    A study quantified the optimal basic reproduction number in order to achieve elimination with minimal economic cost.
    On average and almost all periods, eliminating the impact on GDP growth is better than mitigating.
    At the beginning of 2021, the GDP growth of the five countries that chose to eliminate the epidemic returned to pre-pandemic levels, while the growth of the other 32 OECD countries remained negative.

    In terms of infection consensus, in terms of a country’s economic performance, elimination is better than mitigation.
    In terms of a country’s economic performance, elimination is better than mitigation.

    Despite the health and economic advantages of eliminating the epidemic, this elimination strategy has been criticized for restricting civil liberties.
    This claim can be challenged by analyzing the stringency index developed by researchers at the University of Oxford.
    The index is calculated by combining 8 indicators of containment and closure policies, 8 indicators of health system policies, and 1 indicator of public information campaigns.

    Among the OECD countries, countries that choose mitigation measures have the most serious impact on freedom, while rapid blockade measures consistent with elimination measures are less stringent and have a shorter duration.
    The important thing is that elimination, which has been defined as a way of civic unity, will restore civil liberties the fastest; this focus on common goals is often overlooked in political debates.

    There is evidence that countries that choose to act quickly to eliminate SARS-COV-2, with the strong support of their residents, can better protect their economies and minimize restrictions on civil liberties compared to those that are striving to mitigate the epidemic.
    .
    Looking to the future,
    mass vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine is the key to returning to normal life , but relying only on COVID-19 vaccine to control the pandemic is at risk because of the uneven promotion and absorption of the vaccine, the time limit for immunization , and the emergence of new SARS-CoV -2 variants.
    History has shown that
    vaccination alone cannot control the virus single-handedly, nor can it quickly control the virus.
    Comprehensive public health measures are needed to contain the virus
    .
    Eradication of the epidemic requires coordinated, decades-long efforts, including vaccination, communication and public participation, testing, tracking and isolation measures .
    Even at the end of the vaccination campaign, such public health measures must be maintained to some extent, otherwise a new wave of infections may lead to an increase in morbidity and mortality.
    As the spread of new SARS-CoV-2 variants is worrying, many scientists have called for a coordinated international strategy to eliminate SARS-CoV-2.
    In addition, the U.
    S.
    State Department announced in April 2021 that curbing COVID-19 is the top priority of the Biden-Harris administration, and emphasized that "this pandemic will not end at home until it ends globally.
    "

    Mass vaccination Mass vaccination against COVID-19 COVID-19 vaccine is the key to returning to normal life.
    Vaccine is the key to returning to normal life.
    Immunization can neither control the virus single - handedly nor quickly control the virus by vaccination.
    Comprehensive public health measures to contain the virus.
    Vaccination alone cannot control the virus single-handedly, nor can it quickly control the virus.
    Comprehensive public health measures are needed to contain the virus.
    Eradication of the epidemic requires a coordinated and coordinated process that lasts for decades.
    Efforts, including vaccination, communication and public participation, testing, tracking and isolation measures.
    Eradication of the epidemic requires coordinated, decades-long efforts, including vaccination, communication and public participation, testing, tracking, and isolation measures.

    National action alone is not enough.
    It is necessary to develop a clear global plan to eliminate this epidemic.
    Countries that choose to coexist with the virus may pose a threat to other countries, especially those that cannot obtain the COVID-19 vaccine.
    Uncertainties in the length, duration, and severity of the lockdown will inhibit economic growth, as companies stop investing and consumer confidence deteriorates.
    Global trade and travel will continue to be affected.
    Political indecision and party decision-making have reduced people’s trust in the government.
    This does not bode well for those countries where democracy is regressing

    National action alone is not enough.
    It is necessary to develop a clear global plan to eliminate this epidemic.
    National action alone is not enough.
    It is necessary to develop a clear global plan to eliminate this epidemic.

    At the same time, countries that choose to eliminate SARS-CoV-2 may return to near-normal levels.
    They can restart their economies, allow traffic between green areas, and support other countries to carry out vaccination campaigns and other activities.
    The consequences of different COVID-19 response measures taken by various governments will be long-lasting and will continue after the pandemic is over.
    The early economic and political achievements of countries aiming to eliminate SARS-CoV-2 may be rewarded in the long run.

    Original source

    Miquel Oliu-Barton, Bary SR Pradelski, Philippe Aghion, Patrick Artus, Ilona Kickbusch, Jeffrey V Lazarus, Devi Sridhar, Samantha Vanderslott, SARS-CoV-2 elimination, not mitigation, creates best outcomes for health, the economy, and civil liberties , The Lancet,2021, ISSN 0140-6736, https://doi.
    org/10.
    1016/S0140-6736(21)00978-8.

    Miquel Oliu-Barton, Bary SR Pradelski, Philippe Aghion, Patrick Artus, Ilona Kickbusch, Jeffrey V Lazarus, Devi Sridhar, Samantha Vanderslott, SARS-CoV-2 elimination, not mitigation, creates best outcomes for health, the economy, and civil liberties , The Lancet,2021, ISSN 0140-6736, https://doi.
    org/10.
    1016/S0140-6736(21)00978-8.


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