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    Home > Food News > Food Articles > Maine strengthens seaweed farming

    Maine strengthens seaweed farming

    • Last Update: 2022-05-13
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    From SeafoodNews April 21, some Maine fishermen have been fishing for lobster and other seafood
    for decades,
    and as the sea warms, the future of the
    fishery becomes more uncertain
    .
     
      The Gulf of Maine is warming faster than 99% of the ocean
    .
    Initially, this helped lobster populations grow in parts of Maine, but as temperatures continue to rise, at some point in the future, lobster larvae will not be able to survive at current rates, and these numbers have become unstable and difficult to predict.
    Annual results

    .
     
      Warming oceans could reduce lobster populations by as much as 62 percent by 2050, according to a study by the Gulf Research Institute in Maine
    .
     
      Today, fishermen in Maine are cultivating seaweed
    .
     
      Seaweed farming can also absorb carbon dioxide as it grows, helping to combat acidification of local seawater and helping local marine life grow stronger, such as mussels, and the seaweed farming process, from fertilizer to irrigation, does not require any resources
    .
     
      In 2009 Atlantic Sea Farms became the first fishery to engage in monoculture of seaweed and the first commercially viable fishery in the United States
    .
    The fishery provides employment opportunities for local lobster fishermen by providing another lucrative way to help the coastal region's economy while reducing carbon emissions

    .
    Lobster seafood fishery
     
      The Gulf of Maine is warming faster than 99% of the ocean
    .
    Initially, this helped lobster populations grow in parts of Maine, but as temperatures continue to rise, at some point in the future, lobster larvae will not be able to survive at current rates, and these numbers have become unstable and difficult to predict.
    Annual results

    .
     
      Warming oceans could reduce lobster populations by as much as 62 percent by 2050, according to a study by the Gulf Research Institute in Maine
    .
     
      Today, fishermen in Maine are cultivating seaweed
    .
    seaweed
     
      Seaweed farming can also absorb carbon dioxide as it grows, helping to combat acidification of local seawater and helping local marine life grow stronger, such as mussels, and the seaweed farming process, from fertilizer to irrigation, does not require any resources
    .
     
      In 2009 Atlantic Sea Farms became the first fishery to engage in monoculture of seaweed and the first commercially viable fishery in the United States
    .
    The fishery provides employment opportunities for local lobster fishermen by providing another lucrative way to help the coastal region's economy while reducing carbon emissions

    .
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