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    Home > Biochemistry News > Biotechnology News > New bacteria appear in UK waters as temperatures rise

    New bacteria appear in UK waters as temperatures rise

    • Last Update: 2022-01-25
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    Image: Chichester Harbour Homegrown Oysters

    Source: Dr.
    Luke Helmer

    Rising temperatures have led to an "increasing diversity" of Vibrio bacteria in UK waters, new research shows
    .

    The research, led by the University of Exeter, identified two species of Vibrio - rotifer and jasicida - that had never been recorded in UK waters before
    .

    These species can harm marine life such as shellfish, but the increase in Vibrio species has also raised concerns about human health
    .

    Some Vibrio bacteria can cause gastroenteritis when raw or undercooked shellfish is eaten, and this bacteria can also cause skin infections
    .

    The spread of Vibrio species has led to a "global surge" in Vibrio infections in humans and aquatic animals, the researchers said
    .

    Dr Sariqa Wagley, from the University of Exeter, said: "Vibrio species are usually found in British waters in summer, when temperatures are more favourable for them
    .
    "

    "The diversity of Vibrio species is increasing as climate change causes sea surface temperatures to rise and Vibrio activity in seawater is more prevalent
    .
    "

    The study used data from the UK Met Office to identify locations where summer sea surface temperatures are favourable for Vibrio growth (based on the number of days per year with an average temperature above 18°C)
    .

    The researchers then analysed shellfish samples from four sites used by the shellfish industry - Chichester Harbour, Ossie Island, Whitstable Bay and Lyme Bay
    .

    Dr Wagley said: "We identified Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Chichester Harbour - the leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide
    .
    "

    "Vibrio alginolyticus, which can also cause disease in humans, was found at three sites with sea surface temperatures exceeding 18°C ​​(Chichester Harbour, Ossie Island and Whitstable Bay)
    .

    "It's important to note that thorough cooking can kill harmful Vibrio bacteria in seafood
    .

    "However, the increase in the number and diversity of Vibrio species poses a health risk not only to those who eat seafood, but also to those who use the ocean for recreational purposes - either by ingesting the infected seawater, either because bacteria entered exposed wounds or wounds
    .
    "

    Vibrio is also a threat to a variety of marine species, including shellfish
    .
    Disease costs the global aquaculture industry £6 billion a year, and the disease burden can be devastating

    .

    "In the UK, we haven't seen a large number of shellfish deaths from Vibrio, but it has happened elsewhere, including in France and Australia
    .
    "

    Dr Wagley added: "Our findings support the hypothesis that Vibrio-related disease is increasing and is being influenced by rising ocean surface temperatures
    .
    "

    "We need to monitor this situation closely to protect human health, marine biodiversity and the seafood industry
    .
    "

    Dr Joanne Preston, from the University of Portsmouth, said: "Monitoring the impact of rising sea surface temperatures on potential shellfish pathogens is important, not only for human health and safety, but also for understanding our coastal species.
    and habitat resilience to climate change

    .

    Dr Luke Highmore, from the Blue Ocean Foundation and the University of Portsmouth, added: "The impacts of climate change on the marine environment are likely to be widespread
    .

    "Understanding how these changes will affect ecologically and commercially important species, and the people who depend on them, will be key to moving forward to mitigate their harm
    .
    "

    The research, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), was supported by Chichester and Havant Council and the Sussex Offshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority
    .


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