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    Home > Food News > Nutrition News > New research shows that humans have amazing 'nutritive intelligence'

    New research shows that humans have amazing 'nutritive intelligence'

    • Last Update: 2022-05-26
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    Pioneering research has revealed what drives people's basic food preferences, suggesting that our choices may be smarter than previously thought, influenced by specific nutrients, not just the calories we need
    .

    The international study, led by the University of Bristol in the UK, aimed to re-examine and test the widely accepted idea that humans evolved to prefer energy-dense foods and that our diets simply consist of eating a variety of different foods balance
    .
    Contrary to this belief, the findings suggest that people appear to be "nutritively savvy," where food choices are made in part to meet our vitamin and mineral needs and avoid nutritional deficiencies

    .

    "Our findings are important and quite surprising," said the study's lead author, Jeff Brunnstrom, a professor of experimental psychology.
    "

    For the first time in nearly a century, we show that humans are more complex in their food choices.
    , seems to be choosing based on specific micronutrients, rather than simply eating everything and getting what they need

    .
    "

    The paper, published in Appetite, Gives New Weight Bold research in the 1930s by American pediatrician, Dr.
    Clara Davis, put a group of 15 infants on a diet that allowed them to be "free," in other words, what they wanted to eat, from 33 different food items

    .
    While none of the children ate the same food combinations, they all achieved and maintained good health, which was seen as evidence of "nutritional wisdom

    .
    "

    Its findings were later scrutinized and criticized, but replicating Davis' research was impossible because this form of experimentation on infants is considered unethical today
    .
    So for nearly a century, no scientists have tried to find evidence of human nutritional intelligence -- an ability also found in other animals, such as sheep and rodents

    .

    To overcome these hurdles, Professor Brunnstrom's team has developed a new technique to measure preferences by showing people images of different combinations of fruits and vegetables, so that their choices can be analysed without would jeopardize their health or well-being
    .

    A total of 128 adults participated in both experiments
    .
    The first study showed that people prefer certain food combinations

    .
    For example, apples and bananas may be chosen more often than apples and blackberries

    .
    Notably, these preferences appear to be predicted by the amount of trace elements in a pair of fish and whether their combination provides a balance of different trace elements

    .
    To confirm this, they ran a second experiment with different foods, ruling out other explanations

    .

    To complement and cross-validate these findings, we looked at real diet mixes reported in the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey
    .
    Again, these data suggest that the way people combine meals increases dietary micronutrient intake

    .
    Specifically, components of popular British diets such as 'fish and chips' or 'curry and rice' appeared to provide a wider range of micronutrients than randomly generated meal combinations such as 'chips and curry'

    .

    Another striking aspect of this study is that it embodies an unusual type of collaboration
    .
    Professor Brunnstrom's co-author is Mark Schatzker, a journalist and author and a resident writer at the Yale-affiliated Center for Modern Diet and Physiology

    .
    In 2018, the duo spoke at the annual Florida Conference on Social Feeding Behavior Research, where Schatzker spoke about his book, The Dorito Effect, which examines how whole foods and processed foods taste altered, and the impact on health

    .

    Interestingly, the research of Professor Brunstrom and Mark Schatzker stemmed from a disagreement
    .

    Professor Brunnstrom explained: "I watched Mark's excellent talk where he challenged the accepted view among behavioural nutritionists that humans only seek calories in food
    .
    For example, he pointed out that fine wine, Rare spices and wild mushrooms are very popular, but they are a poor source of calories

    .

    "It was all fun, so I ended up going to see him and basically saying: 'Well told, but I think you might be wrong
    .
    Would you like to test it? This marks the beginning of this wonderful journey, which It turned out I was wrong

    .
    Humans are far from simple-minded generalists as previously thought, and seem to possess a keen intelligence when it comes to choosing a nutritious diet

    .
    "

    Mark Schatzker added: "This study raises important questions, especially in the modern food environment
    .
    For example, is our cultural fixation on fad diets (restricting or prohibiting the consumption of certain types of food) in a way that we don't Understanding in a way that disrupts or interferes with this eating "smart"?"

    "Research shows that animals use taste to direct the vitamins and minerals they need
    .
    If taste plays a similar role in humans, then we may be adding flavor to junk food like potato chips and fizzy drinks, Make them nutritionally 'lustrous

    .
    ' In other words, the food industry may turn our nutritional wisdom against us and cause us to eat foods we would normally avoid, leading to an obesity epidemic

    .
    "

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