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    Home > Active Ingredient News > Study of Nervous System > PNAS: For the first time in humans, using a new type of magnetoencephalogram to visualize fast brain signals

    PNAS: For the first time in humans, using a new type of magnetoencephalogram to visualize fast brain signals

    • Last Update: 2021-05-08
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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                                          magnetic field

                                          magnetic field magnetic field

    Information processing inside the brain is one of the most complex processes in the human body.
    Interruption of this process usually leads to severe neurological disorders.
    Therefore, studying the
    signal transmission inside the brain is the key to understanding countless diseases.
    However, from a methodological point of view, it is difficult to study the signals inside the brain.

    Information processing inside the brain is one of the most complex processes in the human body.
    Interruption of this process usually leads to severe neurological disorders.
    Therefore, studying the
    signal transmission inside the brain is the key to understanding countless diseases.
    However, from a methodological point of view, it is difficult to study the signals inside the brain.

    The brain uses both slow current and fast current to process information.
    When a signal generated by a nerve cell is received by another nerve cell, a slow current is generated
    - called a post-synaptic potential.
    The excitation of subsequent pulses
    ( transmitting information to downstream neurons or muscles ) generates rapid currents with a duration of only one millisecond.
    These are called action potentials.

    The brain uses both slow current and fast current to process information.
    When a signal generated by a nerve cell is received by another nerve cell, a slow current is generated.
    The
    brain uses both slow current and fast current to process information.
    When a signal is received by nerve cells to other nerve cells, it will produce slow current
    - - called post synaptic potential.
    The subsequent pulse is
    called a postsynaptic potential.
    Subsequent pulse
    ( ( to pass information to downstream neurons or muscles pass information to downstream neurons or muscle ) ) excitation will produce only a millisecond duration fast current, which is called action potentials.
    The excitation of s can generate fast currents with a duration of only one millisecond.
    These are called action potentials.

    At this stage, scientists use two methods , electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram (MEG), to visualize brain activity from the outside of the skull.
    However, although the
    results of slow currents measured by EEG and MEG are reliable, the results of fast currents are very different.
    So far, researchers have used electrodes placed inside the brain to measure fast currents.

    At this stage, scientists use two methods , electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram (MEG), to visualize brain activity from the outside of the skull.
    However, although the
    results of slow currents measured by EEG and MEG are reliable, the results of fast currents are very different.
    So far, researchers have used electrodes placed inside the brain to measure fast currents.

    Recently, a research team from Charité-Universityätsmediz and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Berlin used a new and particularly sensitive MEG device to successfully visualize these fast external brain signals for the first time and found an amazing degree of variability.
    The results of the study were published on PNAS .

    Recently, a research team from Charité-Universityätsmediz and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Berlin used a new and particularly sensitive MEG device to successfully visualize these fast external brain signals for the first time and found an amazing degree of variability.
    It was the first time to successfully visualize these rapid brain signals from the outside and found an amazing degree of variability.
    The results of the study were published on PNAS .

    In the new MEG equipment used in the research, the magnetic field sensors inside the magnetic induction accelerator are immersed in liquid helium to cool them to minus 269 degrees Celsius.
    The aluminum foil super insulation layer is installed on the outside to shield the small magnetic field related to nerve cells, which significantly reduces the system generated by the equipment itself.
    Noise increases the sensitivity of MEG technology by 10 times.

    Comparison of the amplitude spectral density recorded in the resting state and the system noise without subject

    Comparison of the amplitude spectral density recorded in the resting state and the system noise without subject

    In order to eliminate external interference sources such as power networks and electronic components, the research was conducted in the shielded room of PTB .
    The researchers
    electrically stimulated specific nerves on the wrists of four healthy subjects, and placed MEG sensors on the hands responsible for processing.
    Right above the area of ​​the brain that feels stimulus.

    In order to eliminate external interference sources such as power networks and electronic components, the research was conducted in the shielded room of PTB .
    The researchers
    electrically stimulated specific nerves on the wrists of four healthy subjects, and placed MEG sensors on the hands responsible for processing.
    Right above the area of ​​the brain that feels stimulus.

    The study found that after subjects undergoing electrical stimulation, a small group of simultaneously activated neurons in the cerebral cortex generates action potentials in response to individual stimuli.
    These fast currents change with each stimulus, and these changes are also independent of the slow currents.
    Although the stimuli for the brain and the hand are the same, there are huge differences in the way the brain processes information related to the touch of the hand.

    The study found that after subjects undergoing electrical stimulation, a small group of simultaneously activated neurons in the cerebral cortex generates action potentials in response to individual stimuli.
    These fast currents change with each stimulus, and these changes are also independent of the slow currents.
    Although the stimuli for the brain and the hand are the same, there are huge differences in the way the brain processes information related to the touch of the hand.

     

     

    A and B: average somatosensory evoked response; C and D: average phase-locked and insensitive time-frequency (TF) representation of magnetoencephalogram response; E: and excess analysis of variance of single test response; example of subject S1 data.

    A and B: average somatosensory evoked response; C and D: average phase-locked and insensitive time-frequency (TF) representation of magnetoencephalogram response; E: and excess analysis of variance of single test response; example of subject S1 data.

    This research is the first non-invasive method to observe the response of nerve cells in the brain to a single sensory stimulus.
    To the extent to which factors such as alertness and fatigue affect the processing of information in the brain.
    If at the same time receive additional stimulus and other research difficulties, open up new paths.
    Lay the foundation for highly sensitive MEG technology.
    To help scientists better understand neurological diseases related to rapid brain signal interruption, such as
    medsci.
    cn/course/search.
    do?w=%E7%99%AB%E7%97%AB">epilepsy and Parkinson's disease, and better treat them.

    It is the first time to observe the response of nerve cells in the brain to a single sensory stimulus in a non-invasive way.
    To the extent to which factors such as alertness and fatigue affect the processing of information in the brain.
    If at the same time receive additional stimulus and other research difficulties, open up new paths.
    It is the
    first time to observe the response of nerve cells in the brain to a single sensory stimulus in a non-invasive way for high sensitivity .
    To the extent to which factors such as alertness and fatigue affect the processing of information in the brain.
    If at the same time receive additional stimulus and other research difficulties, open up new paths.
    Lay the foundation for highly sensitive
    MEG MEG technology.
    To help scientists better understand neurological diseases related to rapid brain signal interruption, such as
    medsci.
    cn/course/search.
    do?w=%E7%99%AB%E7%97%AB">epilepsy and Parkinson's disease, and better treat them.
    Technology lays the foundation.
    Help scientists better understand and treat neurological diseases related to rapid brain signal interruption, such as
    medsci.
    cn/course/search.
    do?w=%E7%99%AB%E7%97%AB">epilepsy and Parkinson's disease.
    medsci.
    cn/course/search.
    do?w=%E7%99%AB%E7%97%AB">epilepsy

    Dr.
    Waterstraat of the
    Department of Neurology of Charité University said that so far, research can only observe fast current signals when nerve cells are receiving information, instead of transmitting information to obtain fast current signals when responding to a single sensory stimulus.

    Dr.
    Waterstraat of the
    Department of Neurology of Charité University said that so far, research can only observe fast current signals when nerve cells are receiving information, instead of transmitting information to obtain fast current signals when responding to a single sensory stimulus.


    Original source:



    Original source:

    Gunnar Waterstraat,Noninvasive neuromagnetic single-trial analysis of human neocortical population spikes.
    Doi: 10.
    1073/pnas.
    2017401118

    Doi: 10.
    1073/pnas.
    2017401118
    Doi: 10.
    1073/pnas.
    2017401118

     

     

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