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    Home > Active Ingredient News > Infection > Pregnant women's flu vaccination has no adverse effects on their children

    Pregnant women's flu vaccination has no adverse effects on their children

    • Last Update: 2021-08-09
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    This article comes from NEJM Journal Watch Does Maternal Influenza Vaccination During Pregnancy Have Adverse Childhood Effects? Does flu vaccination of pregnant women have adverse effects on children? Comment by Andrew M.
    Kaunitz, MD A large-scale study in Canada made us I firmly believe that the flu vaccination of pregnant women will not harm the children exposed before delivery

    .

    Although many professional societies recommend that pregnant women receive inactivated seasonal influenza vaccines, some pregnant women and clinicians are hesitant to vaccinate because they are worried that their children will be exposed to the vaccine in the womb and cause long-term adverse sequelae
    .

    The researchers conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study in Nova Scotia, Canada, with the purpose of comparing the risks of multiple adverse health outcomes between children born to pregnant women who were vaccinated and unvaccinated from 2010 to 2014
    .

    In order to solve the confounding factors, a number of pregnant women parameters are included in the propensity score
    .

    Of the more than 28,000 children, 36.
    2% were born to pregnant women who were vaccinated against influenza during pregnancy

    .

    Among the vaccinated pregnant women, the likelihood of being ≥35 years of age, having no childbirth, and having comorbidities is higher; the likelihood of current or past smoking or the average family income being in the lowest quintile is low
    .

    During an average follow-up period of 3.
    6 years, the adjusted analysis found that vaccination of pregnant women was not associated with the following outcomes of their children: asthma, cancer, infection, emergency department visits and hospitalization

    .

    The pregnancy period (early, middle, and late) of vaccination is not related to the child's outcome
    .

    Comment that pregnant women are more prone to flu complications than non-pregnant women, and flu complications may increase the risk of premature birth or fetal death; therefore, flu vaccination for pregnant women is not only beneficial to themselves, but also to the fetus
    .

    In addition, the transplacental transfer of antibodies can protect the baby within 6 months after birth (vaccinations are not recommended during this period)
    .

    There are currently some documents on the safety of pregnant women and their children after being vaccinated.
    This high-quality Canadian study has added another document

    .

    As the comment writer said, given that there is no flu pandemic from 2020 to 2021, it may be particularly important for pregnant women to receive influenza vaccination during the 2021-2022 flu season
    .

    Commented article[1] Mehrabadi A et al.
    Association of maternal influenza vaccination during pregnancy with early childhood health outcomes.
    JAMA 2021 Jun 8; 325:2285.
    (https://doi.
    org/10.
    1001/jama.
    2021.
    6778)[2 ] Azziz-Baumgartner E et al.
    Realizing the potential of maternal influenza vaccination.
    JAMA 2021 Jun 8; 325:2257; [e-pub].
    (https://doi.
    org/10.
    1001/jama.
    2021.
    7776) Related reading NEJM journal The NEJM Journal Watch is published by NEJM Group.
    Internationally renowned doctors are invited to comment on important papers in the medical field to help doctors understand and use the latest developments

    .

    "NEJM Frontiers of Medicine" is translated several times a week, published on the app and official website, and selected 2-3 articles are published on WeChat
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    Copyright information This article was translated, written or commissioned by the "NEJM Frontiers of Medicine" jointly created by the Jiahui Medical Research and Education Group (J-Med) and the "New England Journal of Medicine" (NEJM)
    .

    The Chinese translation of the full text and the included diagrams are exclusively authorized by the NEJM Group
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    If you need to reprint, please leave a message or contact nejmqianyan@nejmqianyan.
    cn

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    Unauthorized translation is an infringement, and the copyright owner reserves the right to pursue legal liabilities
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