echemi logo
Product
  • Product
  • Supplier
  • Inquiry
    Home > Biochemistry News > Biotechnology News > Researchers report brain-based approach to determining marijuana intoxication damage

    Researchers report brain-based approach to determining marijuana intoxication damage

    • Last Update: 2022-01-24
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
    Search more information of high quality chemicals, good prices and reliable suppliers, visit www.echemi.com

    Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have found that a non-invasive brain imaging procedure is an objectively reliable way to identify those whose performance is impaired by THC, the psychoactive component in marijuana.
    individual

    .
    The technique uses an imaging technique called functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to measure brain activation patterns associated with THC poisoning damage

    .
    According to reports published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, the procedure could have major implications for improving highway and workplace safety

    .

    With the increase in legalized marijuana use, there is an urgent need for a portable brain imaging procedure that can differentiate between THC impairment and mild intoxication
    .
    "Our study represents a new direction in impairment testing in the field," said lead author Dr.
    Jodi Gilman, an investigator at the MGH Center for Addiction Medicine

    .
    "Our goal was to determine whether marijuana damage can be detected from brain activity at the individual level

    .
    This is a key question because 'breathameter' type methods cannot detect marijuana damage, which makes it difficult to be objective during traffic jams Assess THC damage

    .
    "

    In past studies, THC has been shown to impair cognitive and psychomotor performance critical to safe driving, a factor thought to at least double the risk of fatal motor vehicle accidents
    .
    The challenge for scientists, however, is that the concentration of THC in the human body does not correspond well with dysfunction

    .
    One reason is that people who regularly use marijuana have higher levels of THC in their bodies and are not harmed

    .
    Another reason is that THC metabolites stay in the blood for weeks after the last marijuana use, well beyond the intoxication period

    .
    Therefore, a different approach is needed to determine damage from cannabis intoxication

    .

    In the MGH study, 169 marijuana users had near-infrared brain imaging before and after taking oral THC or a placebo
    .
    Compared with those who reported low or no intoxication, participants who reported intoxication after oral administration of THC showed increased concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (HbO) -- a signature of neural activity from the prefrontal cortex of the brain

    .

    "Identifying acute injury from THC poisoning through portable brain imaging may be an important tool in the hands of police officers in the field," explained senior author and principal investigator A.
    Eden Evins, MD, MPH, adult Founding Director of the Center for Addiction Medicine

    .
    "Injuries identified by the machine learning model using only information from fNIRS matched self-reported and clinically assessed injuries 76% of the time, confirming the accuracy of the method

    .
    "

    While this study did not specifically evaluate the use of NIR spectroscopy for roadside assessment of impaired driving, it does cite considerable advantages for this application
    .
    These include the feasibility of an inexpensive, lightweight, battery-operated near-infrared spectrometer device that could store data on wearables or wirelessly transmit data to a laptop

    .
    Additionally, NIR technology can be integrated into a headband or hat, thus requiring minimal setup time

    .

    "Some companies are developing an alcohol-measuring device that only measures people's exposure to marijuana, not the damage marijuana causes," Gilman said
    .
    "We need a method that neither penalizes medical marijuana users.
    , nor will penalize those who have insufficient cannabis in their bodies, affecting their performance

    .
    While this requires further research, we believe that brain-based tests could provide an objective, practical, and much-needed solution

    .

    Gilman is an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School
    .
    Evans is the Cox Family Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School

    .

    The research was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse
    .


    This article is an English version of an article which is originally in the Chinese language on echemi.com and is provided for information purposes only. This website makes no representation or warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness ownership or reliability of the article or any translations thereof. If you have any concerns or complaints relating to the article, please send an email, providing a detailed description of the concern or complaint, to service@echemi.com. A staff member will contact you within 5 working days. Once verified, infringing content will be removed immediately.

    Contact Us

    The source of this page with content of products and services is from Internet, which doesn't represent ECHEMI's opinion. If you have any queries, please write to service@echemi.com. It will be replied within 5 days.

    Moreover, if you find any instances of plagiarism from the page, please send email to service@echemi.com with relevant evidence.