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    Home > Food News > Nutrition News > Sitting and practicing Tai Chi may improve recovery in elderly stroke survivors

    Sitting and practicing Tai Chi may improve recovery in elderly stroke survivors

    • Last Update: 2022-05-28
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    After 3 months, stroke survivors who practiced seated tai chi had better hand and arm strength, shoulder range of motion, balance control, depressive symptoms, and activities of daily living compared with those who participated in a standard stroke rehabilitation program.
    Equal or greater improvement, according to a new study published today in Stroke, the flagship peer-reviewed journal of the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association

    .

    The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke recommend that people begin stroke rehabilitation within 7 days of a stroke and continue for up to 6 months
    .
    However, many survivors opt out of rehabilitation because they lack physical stability or cannot use their arms adequately

    .
    The association also noted in a scientific statement on physical activity and exercise recommendations for stroke survivors, flexibility and muscle strength training, including yoga and tai chi, have been reported to benefit stroke survivors in improving balance, quality of life and mental health, while reducing declines in fear

    .

    Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese martial art that involves a series of slow, careful movements involving the hands, arms, neck, legs and core muscles, combined with deep breathing
    .
    The novelty of the study is that the researchers developed a routine method of sitting and practicing tai chi for people who have recently had an ischemic stroke (clogging of a blood vessel in the brain), hand and arm weakness, or partial paralysis

    .

    "Tai Chi has a long history as a form of exercise in China
    .
    We have adapted Tai Chi movements for people with weakness or partial paralysis

    .
    It is custom-made so participants can move with the help of healthy arms An arm," said Dr.
    Zhao Jie, lead author of the study and a lecturer at Yunnan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in China

    .

    The study was conducted at two traditional Chinese medicine hospitals in Kunming, China
    .
    The researchers recruited 160 adults (mean age 63; 81 men and 79 women) who had their first ischemic stroke within six months of joining the study and retained use of at least one arm

    .
    Of the study participants, half were randomly assigned to a seated tai chi program and the other half were part of a control group to perform a standard stroke rehabilitation exercise program (hospital-recommended upper extremity exercises; Quantity, Implementation Strategies, and Caregiver Responsibilities with Tai Chi) groups are similar)

    .

    Participants in the seated tai chi group received a week of individual training with a tai chi instructor during their hospital stay, as well as a self-guided video of home practice, three days a week for 11 weeks
    .
    The control group received a self-guided practice video of standard exercises and practiced at home for 12 weeks

    .
    Family members and caregivers supervised at-home exercise for both study groups

    .
    69 participants in the Tai Chi group and 65 in the control group completed the 12-week program and 4-week follow-up

    .
    Physical functioning and mental status of all study participants were measured through questionnaires and assessment tools at the start of the study, and 4 additional times during the 16-week program, and results were compared between the two groups

    .

    The researchers analyzed questionnaires and assessment tools and found:

    • People in the Tai Chi group had better hand and arm function and sitting balance control compared to the standard stroke rehabilitation group
      .

    • Compared to the control group, participants in the Tai Chi group experienced significant reductions in depressive symptoms, better shoulder range of motion, and significant improvements in activities of daily living and quality of life
      .

    • More than half of those in the Tai Chi group continued to practice after the 12-week intervention
      .
      During the 4-week follow-up period, the Tai Chi group continued to improve these measures

      .

    "Sitting Tai Chi can be practiced in a chair or wheelchair, which is very convenient because it can be performed at home
    .
    The practice cost of the program is almost zero, and it does not require any special equipment or travel time

    .
    "

    This is the first randomized controlled trial to focus on a modified seated tai chi routine and find improvements in short-term outcomes in a group of patients who may have difficulty adhering to a standard stroke rehabilitation exercise program
    .
    The findings suggest that this mind-body exercise is an effective option for improving balance, coordination, strength and flexibility, especially for stroke survivors with weak or partially paralyzed hands and arms

    .

    "My follow-up research will measure the long-term effects of sedentary Tai Chi," Zhao said
    .
    "People will likely need to stick to sitting tai chi for more than 12 weeks to get beneficial long-term results

    .
    "

    One of the limitations is that the study was conducted in only two centers
    .
    Additionally, the doctors and health care professionals at these centers are trained in traditional Chinese medicine and supported the study, so the findings may not be representative of the recovery of stroke survivors treated at other hospitals

    .

    Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and the leading cause of long-term disability, according to the American Heart Association
    .

    Co-authors Janita Pak Chun Chau, PhD; Huiqiao Chen, PhD; Qiang Meng, PhD; Qizhou Cai, PhD; Xiao Qi, MD; Yali Zhao, MD: Rong He, MD; and Li Qin, MD, the researchers' disclosures are listed in the manuscript
    .

    The researchers say there is no external funding
    .

    The research, published in the scientific journals of the American Heart Association, was peer-reviewed
    .
    The statements and conclusions in each manuscript are those of the authors of the study only and do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the Society

    .
    The Association makes no representations or warranties as to its accuracy or reliability

    .
    The Society primarily accepts individual grants; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceuticals, device manufacturers, and others) also donate and fund specific Society programs and activities

    .
    The Society has strict policies to prevent these relationships from affecting scientific content

    .
    Revenues for pharmaceutical and biotech companies, device manufacturers, and health insurance providers, as well as general financial information for the association, can be viewed here

    .

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    036578

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