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    Home > Food News > Nutrition News > Studies have found that bacteria are the key to vaginal health

    Studies have found that bacteria are the key to vaginal health

    • Last Update: 2021-08-03
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    By Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz, a member of the BIO5 Institute and associate professor of basic medical sciences-Phoenix, the researchers found that the family of the Veillonellaceae bacteria cause inflammation and cell death, increasing and changing the acidity of the cervical microenvironment
    .
    These changes support bacterial vaginosis and create favorable conditions for subsequent gynecological diseases such as sexually transmitted infections and cancer

    .

    "Bacterial vaginosis is a mystery," said Dr.
    Herbst-Kralovetz, who is also the director of the Women's Health Research Project

    .
    "We know that there are many factors that cause this disease, but little is known about the functional impact of the main players and how they change the local environment

    .
    "

    Paper "The Veillonellaceae family is the only three-dimensional epithelial model that changes the cervical metabolic microenvironment in humans," published on July 6 in "npj Biofilm Microorganisms, and found that members of the Veillonellaceae family cause diseases by altering inflammation and metabolism in the cervicovaginal region
    .

    The female reproductive tract is usually colonized by health-promoting bacteria, such as lactic acid bacteria
    .
    Although these bacteria are considered friendly, an imbalance may lead to the production of biofilms—an alliance of many different harmful microorganisms—and thus promote disease

    .

    Last year, Dr.
    Herbst-Krarowitz and his colleagues described a hypothetical model in which the interaction between microorganisms and human cells changes the vaginal microenvironment and ultimately affects health and disease.
    The balance between

    .
    This study is the first to clarify the clear role of this bacterial family in bacterial vaginosis

    .

    Dr.
    Herbst-Krarowitz’s team used a 3D human model to evaluate the impact of three bacteria-atypical porcellus, montanoporus and micro uciformis-on the cervical microenvironment

    .

    They found that two bacteria, atypical Vibrio and Vibrio Montpellier, can reduce the content of lactic acid.
    Lactic acid is usually an acid produced by beneficial bacteria that can protect them from harmful infections

    .
    These two bacteria also increase the substances that play a role in the vaginal odor associated with bacterial vaginosis

    .

    They also found that Mycoplasma micronucleus promotes cell death by increasing inflammation and the production of certain fat molecules, thereby further promoting disease progression
    .

    The results of this research lay the foundation for multi-microbial or "multi-bacteria" research, which can determine the complex interactions of multiple bacterial species on female reproductive health
    .

    "Using this research and our 3D model as a basis, we hope to determine whether and how other species change the environment to cause bacterial vaginosis," Dr.
    Herbst-Krarowitz said

    .
    "We found that different species have different contributions, so we also hope to classify various vaginosis-related bacteria based on their unique effects on the female reproductive tract

    .
    "

    Dr.
    Herbst-Kralovetz said that ultimately, this study and other similar studies can help us understand treatment and intervention strategies

    .

    She said: "It is important to know who are the main participants and how they affect physiological processes and diseases, so that we can develop targeted strategies to treat bacterial vaginosis and prevent subsequent gynecological infections.
    And cancer

    .
    "

    The co-authors of Dr.
    Herbst-Kralovatz from Phoenix Medical College are Postdoctoral Research Assistant Dr.
    Jason Maarsingh in Obstetrics and Gynecology and Dr.
    Pawel Laniewski, Assistant Research Scientist in the Department of Basic Medical Sciences

    .
    Other co-authors include Camlin Garza and Mary Salis, undergraduates participating in the Employment/Exchange Program at the University of Bath

    .

    The research was partially funded by the National Cancer Institute under the National Institutes of Health and the Office of Women's Health Research (3P30CA023074-39S3) and the Folin Foundation (2244)
    .

    Journal Reference :

    1. Mary E.
      Salliss, Jason D.
      Maarsingh, Camryn Garza, Paweł Łaniewski, Melissa M.
      Herbst-Kralovetz.
      Veillonellaceae family members uniquely alter the cervical metabolic microenvironment in a human three-dimensional epithelial model .
      Npj Biofilms and Microbiomes , 2021; 7 ( 1) DOI: 10.
      1038/s41522-021-00229-0

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