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    Home > Active Ingredient News > Study of Nervous System > Translational Psychiatry: Female marijuana addicts have smaller local brain areas

    Translational Psychiatry: Female marijuana addicts have smaller local brain areas

    • Last Update: 2021-05-21
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    Cannabis is the most widely used illegal substance on the planet and the first drug of concern in almost the world's treatment services.
    Gender differences are evident in many aspects of cannabis use and dependence.
    For example, men account for the majority of marijuana users and are more likely to develop dependence on marijuana, but women progress from recreational use to dependence more quickly and relapse more often.
    This difference is partly due to underlying neurobiological gender dependence.
    For example, cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) bind to the psychoactive compounds of cannabis (such as tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)), and their distribution and affinity are affected by sex hormones, which are different for men and women.
    Therefore, there may be gender differences in the neurobiological relevance of cannabis use.

    The role of gender differences in brain volume changes in cannabis users has also not been fully studied.
    In the amygdala (female drug users>female control group), PFC (female drug users>female control, male drug users

    Valentina Lorenzetti et al.
    mapped the neurobiological gender differences between addiction and recreational use of marijuana (using brain capacity as an indicator).
    And published an article in Translational Psychiatry magazine.

    Comparing the target area prior conventional cannabis users 129 (where 70 is the recreational users of marijuana addiction and 59 users) between (i.
    e.
    , amygdala, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, accumbens, orbitofrontal Cortex (OFC, anterior cingulate cortex and cerebellum) volume) and 114 controls recruited from the ENIGMA Drug Addiction Working Group, indicating intracranial volume, age, IQ, and tobacco and alcohol use.
    The volume of the lateral OFC and cerebellar white matter (slightly significant) of cannabis-dependent users, especially women, compared with recreational users and the control group.
    Among addictive (but not entertaining) cannabis users, there is a significant association between women and the smaller white matter of the cerebellum and OFC.
    The amount of OFC can also be predicted by the monthly standard beverage amount.
    No other brain regions of interest have significant effects.

    Predicted amount of cerebellar white matter (WM) and right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in cannabis users (CB).
    The vertical and horizontal lines represent the 95% confidence interval and the effect of grouping by gender, respectively.

    Predicted amount of cerebellar white matter (WM) and right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in cannabis users (CB).
    The vertical and horizontal lines represent the 95% confidence interval and the effect of grouping by gender, respectively.

    This multi-segment MRI study found that compared with the control group, the side OFC and cerebellar white matter of cannabis users showed grouping and grouping gender effects.
    These effects have small to medium scales and have not been corrected by FDR.
    However, the cannabis users and the control group showed no difference in the volume of the amygdala, hippocampus, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and cerebellar gray matter.
    Finally,
    among recreational and dependent cannabis users, it was found that one side OFC and cerebellar white matter volume can be predicted by gender and alcohol dose, but not by cannabis use measurement .

    Among recreational and dependent cannabis users, one side OFC and cerebellar white matter volume were found to be predictable by gender and alcohol dose, but not from cannabis use measurement.
    Among recreational and dependent cannabis users, one side OFC and cerebellum were found White matter volume can be predicted by gender and alcohol dose, but not measured by cannabis use

    The findings of this study provide a basis for future multimodal transportation studies that will examine whether gender and cannabis dependence are specific key drivers of neurobiological changes in cannabis users.
    In turn, this can help identify neural pathways specific to vulnerable cannabis users (for example, women with cannabis dependence) and inform individuals about customized neurobiological treatment targets.

    In summary, the selected ROI (ie, cerebellar white matter and right OFC) for cannabis users was smaller than the control group.
    Women and the presence of cannabis dependence can predict a smaller ROI volume.
    These results indicate that cannabis dependence and women are the driving factors leading to subtle and regional differences in brain volume among cannabis users
    .
    As men and women gain access to cannabis more and more easily, more work is needed to identify the gender differences and the underlying mechanisms of related psychosocial problems in the trajectory of entering and getting rid of cannabis dependence.
    This in turn will help provide future research data on gender-specific drugs and behavioral interventions for men and women who regularly use and rely on cannabis.

    Compared with the control group, the selected ROI (ie, cerebellar white matter and right OFC) for cannabis users was smaller.
    Women and the presence of cannabis dependence can predict a smaller ROI volume.
    These results indicate that cannabis dependence and women are the drivers of subtle and regional brain volume differences among
    cannabis users.
    Compared with the control group, cannabis users have a smaller selected ROI (ie,
    cerebellar
    white matter and right OFC).
    Women and the presence of cannabis dependence can predict a smaller ROI volume.
    These results indicate that cannabis dependence and women are the driving factors that lead to subtle and regional differences in brain volume among cannabis users

    Original source

    Rossetti, MG, Mackey, S.
    , Patalay, P.
     
    et al.
     Sex and dependence related neuroanatomical differences in regular cannabis users: findings from the ENIGMA Addiction Working Group.
     
    Transl Psychiatry  11,  272 (2021).
    https://doi.
    org/10.
    1038/s41398-021-01382-y

    Rossetti, MG, Mackey, S.
    , Patalay, P.
     
    et al.
     Sex and dependence related neuroanatomical differences in regular cannabis users: findings from the ENIGMA Addiction Working Group.
     
    Transl Psychiatry  11,  272 (2021).
    https://doi.
    org/10.
    1038/s41398-021-01382-y
    Rossetti, MG, Mackey, S.
    , Patalay, P.
     
    et al.
    Transl Psychiatry 11, 

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