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    Home > Food News > Nutrition News > Vigorous exercise while dieting can reduce cravings for high-fat foods

    Vigorous exercise while dieting can reduce cravings for high-fat foods

    • Last Update: 2022-05-26
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    The experiment was designed to test people's resistance to the phenomenon of "craving latency," which means that the longer a craving substance is rejected, the harder it is to ignore the signals it sends
    .
    The findings suggest that exercise modulates the mice's effort to respond to particle-related cues, reflecting their craving for particles
    .

    While more research is needed, the study may show that exercise can be enhanced when certain foods are eaten, said Travis Brown, a researcher in physiology and neuroscience at Washington State University.
    restraint
    .

    "A really important part of maintaining your diet is having some brain power -- being able to say, 'No, I might really want to eat, but I'm going to quit
    ,'" said Brown, the study's corresponding author.
    "Exercise is not only good for weight loss, it also Psychological control of cravings for unhealthy foods
    .

    In the experiment, Brown and his colleagues from WSU and the University of Wyoming trained 28 mice to press a lever to turn on a light, make a sound, and then dispense high-fat pellets
    .
    After the training, they tested how many times the mice pressed the lever to get cues from light and tones
    .

    The researchers then divided the mice into two groups: one group ran high-intensity runs on a treadmill; the other group received no additional exercise outside of their daily activities
    .
    For 30 days, neither group of mice could eat high-fat pellets
    .
    At the end of this period, the researchers had the mice approach the lever that dispensed the pellets again, but this time they only gave light and tone cues when the lever was pressed
    .
    The unexercised mice pressed the lever much more often than the exercised mice, suggesting that exercise reduced pellet cravings
    .

    In future studies, the research team plans to investigate the effect of varying levels of exercise on this craving and how exercise suppresses cravings for unhealthy foods in the brain
    .

    While the study is novel, it builds on work by Jeff Grimm of Western Washington University, Brown said
    .
    The team led by Grimm defined the term "craving incubation" for the first time and looked at other ways to disrupt it
    .
    Brown also praised research by Marilyn Carroll Santi of the University of Minnesota, which showed that exercise can reduce cocaine cravings
    .

    Whether food can be as addictive as drugs remains an open research question
    .
    Not all foods have addictive effects; as Brown points out, "no one overeats broccoli
    .
    " However, people do seem to respond to cues, such as fast food ads, that encourage them to eat high-fat or high-fat foods.
    sugary foods, and the longer you diet, the harder those cues become to resist
    .

    The ability to ignore these signals could be another way exercise improves health, Brown said
    .

    "Exercise is beneficial in many ways: It helps with heart disease, obesity and diabetes; it may also help avoid some foods that are not suitable," he said
    .
    "In some ways, we've been looking for this magic pill, and exercise is right in front of us with all these benefits
    .
    "

    Journal Reference :

    1. Georgia E.
      Kirkpatrick, Paige M.
      Dingess, Jake A.
      Aadland, Travis E.
      Brown.
      Acute high‐intensity interval exercise attenuates incubation of craving for foods high in fat .
      Obesity , 2022; DOI: 10.
      1002/oby.
      23418


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