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    Home > Biochemistry News > Biotechnology News > Unexpected: To deal with difficult eczema, sex hormone synthesis genes are the key?

    Unexpected: To deal with difficult eczema, sex hormone synthesis genes are the key?

    • Last Update: 2021-10-01
    • Source: Internet
    • Author: User
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    HSD3B1 (red), nucleus (blue) and lipid droplets (black circular area) in human sebaceous glands
    .

    A study led by a Southwestern Dermatologist at the University of Texas showed that a common skin inflammation may be caused by poor regulation of sex hormones
    .
    The discovery, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), may provide an unexpected new goal for the fight against this disease

    .


    Tamia Harris-Tryon, MD, assistant professor of dermatology and immunology
    .
    The laboratory uses a series of experimental methods to study the interaction between skin bacteria and the immune system

    .

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a type of eczema
    .
    13% of children and 10% of adults suffer from AD.
    In the United States alone, the annual cost of treatment is as high as $5.
    3 billion

    .

    Corresponding author Tamia Harris-Tryon, MD, assistant professor of dermatology and immunology at UTSW, said: "We usually think of eczema as a condition of dry skin.
    Use moisturizers to treat mild eczema

    .
    Here, we show a This gene that is important for the production of sex hormones seems to play a role in the skin making its own moisturizer

    .
    If we can change the activity of this gene, we may help the skin to secrete more oils and lipids to moisturize, thereby Relieve the symptoms of patients with eczema

    .
    "

    Dr.
    Harris-Tryon explained that previous studies have linked AD to the overactive genes responsible for the production of two inflammatory immune molecules, interleukin 4 and 13 (IL-4 and IL-13)

    .
    A relatively new drug dupilumab-a monoclonal antibody that reduces the number of inflammatory molecules-is very effective for many patients with moderate to severe AD

    .
    However, the molecular mechanism of IL-4 and IL-13 causing this form of eczema is unclear

    .

    To investigate this problem, Dr.
    Harris-Tryon and her colleagues focused on sebaceous gland cells

    .
    These glands create an oily waxy barrier that covers the skin and helps the skin retain moisture

    .

    The researchers injected IL-4 and IL-13 into human sebaceous cells growing in a petri dish, and then used a technique called RNA sequencing to read the gene activity of the entire genome and compare it with those that were not processed with these immune molecules.
    The gene activity of sebocytes was compared

    .
    They found that a gene called HSD3B1 increased its activity by 60 times when exposed to these two interleukins

    .
    HSD3B1 produces an enzyme called 3b-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1

    .

    Dr.
    Harris-Tryon said this finding was surprising because it is known that this enzyme plays a key role in the production of sex hormones such as testosterone and progesterone, but it has never been linked to atopic dermatitis and the production of skin lipids.

    .
    The human gene activity database shows that HSD3B1 tends to be overactive in patients with eczema; a single study of dupilumab patients showed that the drug appears to reduce the activity of HSD3B1

    .
    Both pieces of evidence indicate that IL-4 and IL-13 increase the activity of this gene

    .

    To determine how this gene affects sebum secretion, the researchers manipulated the activity of HSD3B1 in sebocytes grown in petri dishes
    .
    They found that when they reduce the activity of this gene, the level of sex hormones will drop and the secretion of skin sebum will increase

    .
    Vice versa, more gene activity leads to more sex hormones and less sebum

    .
    Researchers made similar findings in a mouse model of AD that the secretion of sex hormones reduces the secretion of skin lipids

    .

    In summary, Dr.
    Harris-Tryon said, these findings suggest that HSD3B1 may be a new target against AD and other forms of eczema

    .
    She added: "Altering the output of this gene may ultimately provide a treatment for AD that is completely different from any currently existing treatment

    .
    "

    Interleukins 4 and 13 drive lipid abnormalities in skin cells through regulation of sex steroid hormone synthesis 

    https://doi.
    org/10.
    1073/pnas.
    2100749118





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